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when to retire a rope?
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dummy123


Jun 1, 2005, 10:16 AM
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when to retire a rope?
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At what point do you retire a dynamic rope?
I have been rappelling and climbing (mostly top rope) on this rope lightly for about 1.5 years. There is very little wear on the sheath and there is pleanty of streach left in it.
Should i try and aviod useing the rope for rappelling to extendy the life?
At what point does a rope become unsafe.

thanks for you time!


sava6e


Jun 1, 2005, 11:11 AM
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well if your in doubt dont use it, also might want to try searching the database i know ive seen this post a couple times before. just from rappelling shouldnt do damage to your rope unless your flying down it. pretty much unless you store it near chemicals, take a lot of falls, dont keep it clean then its probably fine.


sava6e


Jun 1, 2005, 11:13 AM
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well if your in doubt dont use it, also might want to try searching the database i know ive seen this post a couple times before. just from rappelling shouldnt do damage to your rope unless your flying down it. pretty much unless you store it near chemicals, take a lot of falls, dont keep it clean then its probably fine.


micronut


Jun 1, 2005, 11:30 AM
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Re: when to retire a rope? [In reply to]
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In reply to:
At what point do you retire a dynamic rope?

I have been rappelling and climbing (mostly top rope) on this rope lightly for about 1.5 years. There is very little wear on the sheath and there is pleanty of streach left in it.

sound fine to me, unless you had in stored in direct sunlight or around chemicals, like the previous poster stated.

In reply to:
Should i try and aviod useing the rope for rappelling to extendy the life?

what you should avoid is excessive lowering. Lowering wears the sheath out more than anything else. Have your peeps clip in and rap if it's anything but a friction-less lower. If you're climbing with total nOObs, you'll still proabally want to lower them evn if there is some friction.

In reply to:
At what point does a rope become unsafe.


un-safe for what? Once you deem your rope "unsafe" for leading, you can still use it for TR's, a second rope for long raps, hauling, fixing on your latest sport project, slinging out a top rope, etc......

but it sounds like yours is fine...........sling out your TR's and don't speed rap.


wjca


Jun 1, 2005, 11:32 AM
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Ask attacoa and he'll tell you to get rid of it after the cat pisses all over it.


How much rappelling are you doing? If you are toproping, is there a need to do a lot of rappelling? I would think that light use (a couple of times a month) for a year and a half with just toproping and rapping down to the base of the climb after setting up the top rope would be fine. With similar use, you have several more years left in the rope as long as there are not visual signs of damage, lumps, stiff spots, etc.

If you have doubts, I am sure there are numerous people on this site that would be willing to test it out for you or take it off your hands if you don't trust it. Just wait, they'll present themselves.


jeep4evr


Jun 1, 2005, 12:18 PM
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Don't trust it, I'll take it off your hands for you. As a bonus I'll test it and let you know in the end how much life you had left in it.
Peace.


dummy123


Jun 1, 2005, 1:31 PM
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press alt-f4 and i will send it right out too you.


hikerken


Jun 4, 2005, 10:58 PM
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From the UIAA website:

http://www.uiaa.ch/article.aspx?a=76&c=1
A SUMMARY OF THE CONFERENCE ON NYLON AND ROPES, TURIN, MARCH 8/9, 2002

5. When to retire a rope; a study of rope wear:
- it is hardly any news that the principal factors of rope wear are the combined effects of rubbing against rock, mechanical reduction (rappelling and belaying devices), dust and microcrystals that penetrate the sheath and the number of meters climbed (not the time used),
- the enemy of rope wear is friction
- most intense in abseiling and top roping, made worse by dirt, and the inevitable rubbing against rock, - some abseiling devices produce much more wear damage than others,
- after only 50 descents with a figure-eight, the dynamic resistance of a rope is reduced by one third (number of drops). The descents were undertaken with extreme care
- slowly and without impact,
- rappelling with a Robot (a multi-use device manufactured by Kong) does not appear to compromise the dynamic resistance of the rope. The device functions like a carabiner brake,
- not surprisingly rope wear is much more severe on granite than on limestone,
- rope degradation is approximately proportional to the number of broken textile yarns of the sheath,
- current work confirms previously published information. After climbing approximately 5000 meters, the dynamic resistance of the rope is reduced to half and after an additional 6000 meters it is down to 30 % (UIAA Bulletin # 146, June 1994, in German),
- see also The Journal of the UIAA #3, 2000, pp. 12 - 13.

6. Safety Loss of Mountaineering Ropes by Lowering Cycles in Toprope Climbing. This paper details the surprising loss of capacity in dynamic mountaineering ropes due to top roping. The translation is not of high quality. A better edited version can be found in www.alpineclubofcanada.ca/services/safety/index.html :

Summary

The drop tests carried out on mountaineering ropes, which were aged in lowering procedures (to­prope climbing), have shown that with an increasing number of lowering cycles the number of drops without breaking strongly decreases. Rope sections, which were bent in the figure eight descender or in the Munter hitch, for only 80 low­ering cycles have only about half, or less than half, of the capacity of a new rope left. This safety loss occurs customarily after few days of top rope climbing. By superimposing other factors of rope degradation upon those caused by the bending in the belay devices and the top carabiner, one can expect a further decrease in the number of drops held without breaking. The safety loss is of no consequence for a rope used solely as a toprope because fall factors are small but is critical for lead climbing, when larger fall heights are possible.


hikerken


Jun 4, 2005, 11:05 PM
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From the UIAA website:

http://www.uiaa.ch/article.aspx?a=76&c=1
A SUMMARY OF THE CONFERENCE ON NYLON AND ROPES, TURIN, MARCH 8/9, 2002

5. When to retire a rope; a study of rope wear:
- it is hardly any news that the principal factors of rope wear are the combined effects of rubbing against rock, mechanical reduction (rappelling and belaying devices), dust and microcrystals that penetrate the sheath and the number of meters climbed (not the time used),
- the enemy of rope wear is friction
- most intense in abseiling and top roping, made worse by dirt, and the inevitable rubbing against rock, - some abseiling devices produce much more wear damage than others,
- after only 50 descents with a figure-eight, the dynamic resistance of a rope is reduced by one third (number of drops). The descents were undertaken with extreme care
- slowly and without impact,
- rappelling with a Robot (a multi-use device manufactured by Kong) does not appear to compromise the dynamic resistance of the rope. The device functions like a carabiner brake,
- not surprisingly rope wear is much more severe on granite than on limestone,
- rope degradation is approximately proportional to the number of broken textile yarns of the sheath,
- current work confirms previously published information. After climbing approximately 5000 meters, the dynamic resistance of the rope is reduced to half and after an additional 6000 meters it is down to 30 % (UIAA Bulletin # 146, June 1994, in German),
- see also The Journal of the UIAA #3, 2000, pp. 12 - 13.

6. Safety Loss of Mountaineering Ropes by Lowering Cycles in Toprope Climbing. This paper details the surprising loss of capacity in dynamic mountaineering ropes due to top roping. The translation is not of high quality. A better edited version can be found in www.alpineclubofcanada.ca/services/safety/index.html :

Summary

The drop tests carried out on mountaineering ropes, which were aged in lowering procedures (to­prope climbing), have shown that with an increasing number of lowering cycles the number of drops without breaking strongly decreases. Rope sections, which were bent in the figure eight descender or in the Munter hitch, for only 80 low­ering cycles have only about half, or less than half, of the capacity of a new rope left. This safety loss occurs customarily after few days of top rope climbing. By superimposing other factors of rope degradation upon those caused by the bending in the belay devices and the top carabiner, one can expect a further decrease in the number of drops held without breaking. The safety loss is of no consequence for a rope used solely as a toprope because fall factors are small but is critical for lead climbing, when larger fall heights are possible.


kpj240789


Jun 5, 2005, 6:18 AM
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Registered: Jan 26, 2005
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Re: when to retire a rope? [In reply to]
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In reply to:
well if your in doubt dont use it, also might want to try searching the database i know ive seen this post a couple times before. just from rappelling shouldnt do damage to your rope unless your flying down it. pretty much unless you store it near chemicals, take a lot of falls, dont keep it clean then its probably fine.

Looks like I've seen this post a couple times to.


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