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Bouncy testing
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bigwallgumbie


Jul 24, 2002, 10:09 PM
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Registered: Jul 11, 2002
Posts: 86

Bouncy testing
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High all! I've posted here a couple times but never really said hi.

Anyways, I've been trying to figure out how to _really_ bounce test for a while now. I've done some c-stuff (a VI and a few V's) but I haven't really nailed. Some peopel I've talked too have said not too bounce too hard so you don't rip the gear out. I've also heard (and from here on rc.aid) to bounce till your rack is around your ears. So??? Really what I want to know is how hard to bounce (and how much to trust) a beak, rurp, head, blade, angle, etc. ??? Thanks.


apollodorus


Jul 24, 2002, 10:26 PM
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Registered: Feb 18, 2002
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Bouncy testing [In reply to]
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The idea is to see if the piece is good. But, that is relative to the stretch you're on. Faking a big whipper on A4 will pull the piece that you could have moved up on. And you with it. Ballet stancing might get you up onto the piece that then rips, and the rest of the pitch with it. If you're at the stage of having to bounce-test pieces, you know that it's a judgment pitch, not something a topo or guidebook is going to get you up. You have to know, because you've whipped before, whether or not you're going to stand tall, or creep up cowardly. Sometimes it holds, and sometimes it pops. If you bounce test each piece as you go along, you put the odds in your favor. BUT: if you are standing on mank and bounce too much, you'll pull the test piece, you, and everything below. It's called Hard Aid. Look it up.

"It's supposed to be hard. The Hard is what makes it great. If it was easy, everybody would do it." - Tom Hanks


wonderbread


Jul 24, 2002, 11:15 PM
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Registered: Mar 13, 2002
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don't forget that you don't need to get on that piece to test it, pull out the funkness and test it. this gives you the advantage of putting your hand on the piece and feeling if it's moving around at all.


karlbaba


Jul 26, 2002, 5:24 PM
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Registered: Jul 10, 2002
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Just a few words about fixed manky pieces:

I only test fixed dicey pieces with body weight only if no other placement is available. After all, you're pretty much going to use it, so why overstress it?

The companion strategy is: if the piece is really unlikely to hold a fall, don't clip it as pro. (new aid climbers beware, you'd be amazed at what will hold a fall)

I fell on the groove pitch on the Shield years ago when a fixed head ripped. I was held by a fixed rurp with a cable sling. I was so grateful that I hadn't clipped into a number of manky fixed junk pieces that I didn't have to replace on my way back up the pitch.

I like to test with my daisy chain so I can be balanced in both aiders in case the piece rips. If the piece passes the bounce test, I just hang on the daisy and move the aiders up

Peace

karl


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