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timpanogos


Jul 27, 2002, 8:10 PM
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Now that I’m getting more and more into trad/alpine trad, I would like to learn more about rescue techniques. I have studied/played with escaping a belay, but what then? What if I’m belaying a lead, he has fallen and I need to get to him right away? Same question for a second. What if I’m on something other than the ground level of the first pitch – how do I get off to get help. Any info from here, web links and/or book recommendations would be greatly appreciated.



jmlangford


Jul 27, 2002, 9:08 PM
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Here is a link to a great book on Self-rescue-I highly recommend it. Also, Mountaineering-Freedom of the Hills should be on everyones shelf.


mountainmonkey


Jul 29, 2002, 8:41 AM
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The book SELF RESCUE is probably the best book for that. It gives you alot of scenarios and how to deal with them. Self rescue seems simple until you actually try it, then you will need all the tools you can get. I wish every climber read this book before venturing out on the rock....

casey


ken4bianca


Aug 8, 2002, 5:49 PM
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Both answers that were given previously are outstanding and I also believe that everyone should know how to conduct rescue/self-rescue. Don't forget to know how to perfomr a leader rescue! Too many people get hurt and don't know how to get out of the situation. Freedom of the Hills, 6th Edition by The Mountaineers is an outstanding reference to mountaineering. They have a good chapter on lowering/rescue that you would find to assist you greatly. Practice these systems until they are second nature to you. You never know what the situation will encompass, so be prepared!

Good Luck, Climb Safe...

"Gravity Never Sleeps"


pbjosh


Aug 9, 2002, 8:09 AM
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Self rescue is an imperative skill to have if you're going to get into backcountry/alpine climbing, mountaineering or anything where help isn't 20 feet away. Even if help is close by, unfortunately most people are not competent at self rescue and by far the best course of action is for both you and your partner to be well practiced!

Reading Freedom of the Hills is a must for nearly everyone. The Self Rescue book from the How to Climb! series is excellent, a must read (multiple reads in fact). But most important is taking your new found book learned skills to the crag and performing an actual rescue. Build a bomber anchor 40' off the deck to simulate the top piece of gear that your partner fell on. Have your partner hang 20' below this and pretend to be completely unconcious. Try to escape the belay, build an anchor, tie off your partner to the anchor, ascend to your partner, re-rig the system and rap with your partner to safety. It'll teach you little things that the book might not reinforce enough like:

Need to have some gear on your or otherwise be able to build an anchor for a STRONG UPWARD PULL to conduct the rescue. Need a few slings and biners in addition to just your prussiks. Need to belay in a spot where you CAN build an anchor. But most importantly, need to PRACTICE!

My girlfriend was nearly killed in a lead fall on a remote grade V free climb this spring - I was certainly glad we had spent multiple days at the crag honing our rescue skills as we were able to rappel 8 double rope raps with her delerious, contused and bleeding severely, hike several hours up a brushy/3rd-classy gully and get out before dark to drive to a hospital.

It's no BS that self-rescue skills are the difference between life and death. Practice them regularly and don't get over your head without them. Same goes for crevasse rescue skills if you're into glaciers and mountaineering.

josh


offwidth


Aug 9, 2002, 11:25 AM
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That's great advice. Practice, practice, practice.

Also try to back up everyone on a top rope so you don't drop anyone while practicing.


sparky


Aug 9, 2002, 8:14 PM
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I saw some guy break his leg a few pitches once, they had a ton of rescuers in there pretty quick, but because of that I'm going to take aself rescue class.


mountainmonkey


Aug 13, 2002, 9:11 AM
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Strangely, my partner and I assisted the rescue of a guy who fell and had a compound fracture of his ankle 3 pitches up on Redgarden wall in Eldorado Canyon on August 2 (4 days after my previous post). He fell on the roof of Electric Aunt Jemima, next to the Grand Giraffe, pulled a piece and impacted on the slabs below. We climbed two pitches to get up to them (we were already up to do a climb) and see what we could do. We got a first aid kit from a guide who was on a route nearby and bandaged him up (there was a lot of bleeding). Next, we decided not to waste time waiting for the rescuers and start lowering him down. We were on the last 100 foot lower when the first rescuer got to us from above (he was lowered on a 600 foot rope) and we were told that we bought a lot of time off the rescue, at least an hour. This can make a real difference especially with weather (summer thunderstorms) and nightfall. Self rescue could be the most important tool, second only to building good anchors/belay systems. Be Safe.

casey bernal


marcel


Aug 13, 2002, 9:53 AM
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Good job on the rescue mountainmonkey! You are also right about self rescue. Many of the place I climb self rescue is the only option, unless you want to wait several days.


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