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edgelounger


Oct 28, 2002, 12:11 PM
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Guidebooks and Access
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has anyone ever measured the impact of a guidebook on a public land climbing area?

how do you feel about areas on public land with no guidebook having one printed or posted on the web?

has anyone directly experienced this in their area?




madscientist


Oct 28, 2002, 12:49 PM
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I have experienced the increase in popularity after a guide to a local area has been published on the web. The 420 boulders up the Poudre canyon was a local hatspot for a couple of years. The bouldering is amazing, and the location is good. Before it was published on the internet, I thought it was fairly popular since there would be around five people there almost every time I went. It is over an hour drive from any twon with more than 1,000 people.

Then it got published on the net. Now, there has been 30 people at the main area. Unfortantly, the area cannot handle this many people on a regular basis. I have picked up tape, band aids, and other trash. The parking areas, pull outs, are growing, and I am sure the land managers are noticing.

I would not tell anyone they should not be there. They all have as much of a right as I do, but a published guide has made a noticable impact.

There are other factors that could be contributing. Many boulders wanted to know the location of this area for a long time. Some of the problems were published in the climbing magazines, i.e. Circadian Rythm (sp?). There was a video showing many of the problems, and the quality of the boulder problems is excellent.

I am just curious why you wanted to know?


tigerbythetail


Oct 28, 2002, 6:13 PM
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 Measured the impact? Not in any sort of scientific way, but the signs are telling and obvious. With more people comes more trash, erosion and potential access issues.

How would I feel? How would you feel about no guide? What are your reasons for wanting/needing to publish a guide, even an online one? Do you feel you will be doing the climbing community a public service? Do you climb often at this area? How do the local climbers feel about your idea?

One thought is why is there no existing guide? Perhaps locals have decided not to put one out. There are local areas where I climb with no guidebook, but if you showed up you'd get the tour. Now if you went and told everybody and their brother at the gym we might have to come visit you at night...

Putting a guide out on the net will probably attract a lot more people, people who aren't even locals and people who might never have even considered going to this place. Nothing wrong with non-locals, it's just the manner in which they treat the area. Locals live in or near the area and tend to have a deeper respect for their local crags, because if there are problems with the crags it will directly affect them. Non-locals can easily just move on to the next "hot spot" and not care a whit. My point is why give away the info to people who wouldn't go there if there was none? The rocks are there, have at it and have fun. Must every boulder, cliff and rockpile be namned, rated and cataloged? Climb the routes and make your own personal guide.

Experience with this sort of thing? Oh, hell yes!


edgelounger


Nov 5, 2002, 9:15 AM
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i have some friend that think public land guide books should find out some way to measure impact before and after a publication is made.

this impact statement approach is common for other activities...


Partner philbox
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Nov 20, 2002, 6:24 PM
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   There`s a famous example of what happens when an area is publicised in a guidebook. The area is in South East Queensland. The guide book was published in a national climbing magazine. Before the guide was published the crag was open to all and the climbers who went there were on very good terms with the landowner.

After the guide was published the crag was inundated with a great number of climbers from out of state who did not show any respect to the landowner whatsoever. What really capped it off was that a group of climbers broke into the local community hall and stole a table which they hauled up to their makeshift camp.

This crag is now closed and any attempt to even aproach the landowner is met with a hail of bullets. So yeah publishing a guidebook can sometimes result in very drastic consequenses.

I have been responsible for opening up a crag near where I live and I am constantly aware of the possibility that the publishing of a guide could result in all the hardwork that has been put into that cliff may come to nought not to mention the expense of equipping over fifty routes.

Yes we do have a guide but it is not widely publicised and it is available to those who seek us out and ask. This way we have some control over events, we are also able to warn people verbally as to the nature of the local rednecks.

...Phil...


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