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ranski


Apr 28, 2008, 8:30 PM
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Registered: Oct 29, 2002
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First Photo Post
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A few weeks back I finally got a chance to take my new camera (NIKON D40x) out on a climbing trip to Arkansas. This is the first time I have shot a climber from above while hanging from a rope...what a trip - there were times I forgot which way was up ;-)

I definitely have alot to learn about the mechanics of setting up and getting into position...oh and next time I will make sure the belayer tiddies up the rope.

What are your thoughts on this image...




Myxomatosis


Apr 28, 2008, 8:46 PM
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Re: [ranski] First Photo Post [In reply to]
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Good start mate... but a few things you could have improved on (perhaps already in your set of photos) is some facial expression on the climber, capturing his emotions... (or placing some gear)

I think thats all its missing :) Nice work.


kriso9tails


Apr 28, 2008, 11:47 PM
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Re: [ranski] First Photo Post [In reply to]
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Composition is unbalanced and a little... claustrophobic (imo), but at least it leads to the climber, who's body position is pretty decent. The main problem is the crop, especially on the right hand edge; it just cuts the image leaving it feeling incomplete and boxed in. Maybe a slight angle change in either direction and not so zoomed in would have worked better for this.

I think you'd have been better off with a wider lens and closer to the climber to give it a bit more depth, but maybe that wasn't possible at the time. I think it'd have also been good to stop up your aperture enough to throw the belayer a bit out of focus, or to stop down to get him a bit sharper (probably the former though... common, yeah, but there's a reason for that). Then again, it could just be because it's a screen size/ resolution image, but he (the belayer) sort of appears to be neither blurred nor tack sharp, which isn't the best middle ground to take.

The exposure is good and the light looks like it was pretty decent, and again, the climber as a stand-alone element is pretty good (just doesn't come out enough with this composition I feel).


(This post was edited by kriso9tails on Apr 28, 2008, 11:56 PM)


ranski


Apr 29, 2008, 7:42 AM
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Re: [kriso9tails] First Photo Post [In reply to]
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All good feedback...

I was really battling the lighting. This route is in the shade. Just of the frame to the left was full sun so in this case I chose to tighten up the compostion. Although, i will agree it feels cramped.

Like I stated it was strange for me to be held in a fairly fixed postion due to the rope.

I'm thinking I need to scout the routes in the future to know the ideal set-up location as well as the lighting situation, prior to shooting.


Partner cracklover


Nov 12, 2008, 2:37 PM
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Re: [ranski] First Photo Post [In reply to]
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In reply to:
there were times I forgot which way was up ;-)

Understandable. But unfortunately you have re-created this nauseating feeling for the viewer - me.

To start with, Both the climber, and especially the belayer, are upside down. Why did you choose to orient the photo in this direction? Rotate 90 degrees in the direction of your choice! You'll get much more emotional impact, too, because your viewer will be able to relate to the expressions on the climber (and, in this case, belayer). You can't read emotion at all on an upside-down face.

My $.02

GO


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