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Yuji and Hans reposted with changes
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Paul_Y


Nov 19, 2008, 8:22 AM
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Yuji and Hans reposted with changes
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Thanks to Jason and Kris for their critiques. Here is a redone version. I brought it into Nikon Capture NX2 and worked on it in its raw state. I changed the white balance to cloudy, and used NX2's color points to selectively change contrast on the trees, Yuji, and the rock around Yuji. And I cropped the image more tightly.

If the image doesn't come up at 800 pixels wide, click on the image.

Thanks for the critiques guys. And if you see more room for improvement, fire away!




chanceboarder


Nov 19, 2008, 9:04 AM
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Re: [Paul_Y] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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Yeah that has a lot more "pop" to it. The colors stand out and the flatness is gone. I like it a lot better now.

Jason


blondgecko
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Nov 19, 2008, 2:08 PM
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Re: [Paul_Y] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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A useful trick I picked up... somewhere or other... is to create a duplicate layer in Photoshop, set its mode to "Multiply" and then play around with the layer opacity to set the strength of the effect. Easy way to get just that little bit more pop.


Paul_Y


Nov 19, 2008, 3:27 PM
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Cool tip, and easy to do, thanks!


blondgecko
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Nov 19, 2008, 5:24 PM
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Re: [blondgecko] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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blondgecko wrote:
A useful trick I picked up... somewhere or other... is to create a duplicate layer in Photoshop, set its mode to "Multiply" and then play around with the layer opacity to set the strength of the effect. Easy way to get just that little bit more pop.

Hmm. Started playing around with Lab mode colour as posted by Kris in the other thread on this topic. My first impression is that the above technique works really well in this mode! Gives much better saturation than when you do the same in RGB.

Switched to Lab mode, duplicate layer, multiply, leave opacity at 100% and bump up Lightness in curves:



He maybe looks a little sunburnt in this, but you get the idea.
Attachments: DSC_5928_800_new.jpg (136 KB)


kriso9tails


Nov 19, 2008, 7:05 PM
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Re: [blondgecko] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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Short Explanation:

Duplicate layer + multiply mode is good for darkening an image that looks overblown, but not necessarily for flat images or adding contrast in general.

Conversely, if the image looks underexposed you can use the same trick only it'd be duplicate layer + screen mode.

If you just want to adjust contrast overall, then curves is the best tool.

If you have a bunch of similar colours in a scene and you want to bring out some colour contrast then curves in Lab mode is the best way to go.

Less Short Explanation:

No real revelation here, but blend modes create new values based on the interaction of the values in a base layer and a blend layer.

With multiply mode it multiplies the the values of each colour channel (as a percent) to produce a new value. So, going channel by channel Photoshop will do the following (in RGB):

(base layer x blend layer)/255

as an example, if you had a solid colour, r:118 g:65 b: 33 and you created a duplicate layer and switched the blend mode to multiply on the top layer, you'd get the following result;

r: (118 x 118)/255 = 55
g: (65 x 65)/255 = 17
b: (33 x 33)/255 = 4

r:55 g:17 b:4

1) if either layer's channel has a value of 0 then the result will be 0
2) If either layer's channel has 255 as a value then the result will be the other layer's channel value

Because of this, multiply will create contrast with a duplicate layer, but unless you're using pure white, it will always darken the image as well. By reducing the opacity of the blend layer, you also reduce the amount of contrast added. Overall, you have very little control this way.

Screen mode is similar only with the inverse effect: 255 - ((255- base layer)(255-blend layer))/255

Curves is the best option for overall contrast. It just maps out densities along a gradient and allows you to manipulate them. In RGB and CMYK you can alter the master curve, or the curve of each channel individually; it is the single most fluid tool for this in Photoshop.

LAB mode, however, is unique. It is comprised of three channels: one for luminance and two that contain colour data. The channel structuring is a little odd, but the important thing to understand is that lightness and darkness in the image are determined by the luminance channel. The a and b channels control colour. Because of this you can control the overall contrast of the image by adjusting the curve for the luminance channel and you can control the colour contrast separately by adjusting the curves for the a and b channels.


Actually, that's a really bad explanation, but halfway through I realized that it wasn't as simple as it all seemed in my head. Well, there are some very simple and practical applications of these things, but they make more sense when you see them done.

(This post was edited by kriso9tails on Nov 19, 2008, 9:51 PM)


kriso9tails


Nov 19, 2008, 7:22 PM
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Re: [kriso9tails] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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Oh, and the new version looks much better.


Paul_Y


Nov 23, 2008, 5:17 AM
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Re: [kriso9tails] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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Blondegecko and Kris, Thanks for your insghts into contrast manipulation!
Dris, This is a very detailed and clear explanation of the various ways to manipulate contrast and saturation. Thanks for taking the time to explain, I will experiment with these!


(This post was edited by Paul_Y on Nov 23, 2008, 5:23 AM)


wes_allen


Nov 24, 2008, 10:22 AM
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Re: [blondgecko] Yuji and Hans reposted with changes [In reply to]
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blondgecko wrote:
A useful trick I picked up... somewhere or other... is to create a duplicate layer in Photoshop, set its mode to "Multiply" and then play around with the layer opacity to set the strength of the effect. Easy way to get just that little bit more pop.

You can also create a duplicate layer, change it to b/w and set the mode to soft light (less strong) or overlay (stronger) to increase the contrast. Just adjust the opacity to change the strength of the effect. Then you can also create a layer mask to limit where the effect is applied. I use this alot, but if you have shadows in the wrong part of the image, it will really show them. And, it will sometimes crush the blacks, but sometimes I like doing that.


kriso9tails


Nov 24, 2008, 1:22 PM
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You can also use overlay. All three blend modes use a combination of multiply and screen.

Along the same lines, if you run the high pass filter on the duplicate layer and then switch to overlay, soft light or hard light you get a sharpening effect that works really well for eyes and small detail areas that look too soft. Invert the high pass layer and you get a nice soft focus effect that's nice for portraits and landscapes where the lighting came off a little harder than you wanted.


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