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Sealevel


Apr 14, 2012, 11:48 PM
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Garage Woodie Design
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Hello to the forum -

Living in South Texas leaves little opportunity for a beginning climbing enthusiast. With the nearest gym several hours away, the garage woodie will have to fill the urge.

Area is ~ 11'x11' with 9' ceiling. Got the basics from the Metolius pdf. Walls are 8'x8' with a 1' kick plate(?), 20 and 10 degree slope. I'm in my mid 40's and although I'm pretty active, I'm not in the shape I was 20 years ago. I also have two kids 9 & 12.

I figure the easier slopes will keep everyone interested without being overly difficult. I plan to include holds mounted on the ceiling along with a suspended DIY campus device for additional conditioning.

Anyways, here is my idea, Comments are greatly appreciated.



doktor_g


Apr 15, 2012, 12:09 AM
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Re: [Sealevel] Garage Woodie Design [In reply to]
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Sealevel,
That looks like a pretty nice design. I have only a few suggestions:
1. Your corner would be better for training if it wasn't at a 90 which allows stemming.
2. If you don't have an area to do pull-ups with a hang board, you might consider sacrificing some height to add a small horizontal roof. Just a little something where you can screw on a hang board.
3. 1' kick plates are a very wise choice.
4. Also you'll fine the best training angles at 10-20 degrees. So I agree on your choice. Only first time builders make the rookie mistake of going steep.
5. When you are finished up building, resist the urge to start throwing holds on. Get a gallon or two of bondo and seal up the cracks. Sand the edges, and paint the whole thing in earth tones. The kids will love it and it looks a lot cooler in the garage.
6. Oh yeah. Make sure you can get to the back of all points of the gym so you can service the T-Nuts if need be

DrG


(This post was edited by doktor_g on Apr 15, 2012, 12:10 AM)


Sealevel


Apr 15, 2012, 1:03 AM
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Thanks for the reply.
After a quick search for "stemming" and a few vids, I learned something...lol.
So the back corner should be more of a U shape, I guess?
Paint and stenciling big bold graphics are in the plan along with a few kickers to belay the kiddos.
Hangboard (for sure) and assorted ceiling toys will come as I gain experience.
Thanks again for the advice.


guangzhou


Apr 15, 2012, 2:53 AM
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doktor_g wrote:
Sealevel,
That looks like a pretty nice design. I have only a few suggestions:
1. Your corner would be better for training if it wasn't at a 90 which allows stemming.

Actually, I think making an overhanging arete there would be more useful than stemming from a tran point of view.

In reply to:
2. If you don't have an area to do pull-ups with a hang board, you might consider sacrificing some height to add a small horizontal roof. Just a little something where you can screw on a hang board.
3. 1' kick plates are a very wise choice.
Kick plate is great advice.

In reply to:
4. Also you'll fine the best training angles at 10-20 degrees. So I agree on your choice. Only first time builders make the rookie mistake of going steep.

If I understand the diagram, you have more than one angle. Watch the fall zone from one wall to the other.
In reply to:
5. When you are finished up building, resist the urge to start throwing holds on. Get a gallon or two of bondo and seal up the cracks. Sand the edges, and paint the whole thing in earth tones. The kids will love it and it looks a lot cooler in the garage.

Plain wood works great.
In reply to:
6. Oh yeah. Make sure you can get to the back of all points of the gym so you can service the T-Nuts if need be

True true true

DrG


Sealevel


Apr 15, 2012, 11:59 AM
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As I'm all OCD on this wall thing, got a couple design mods. Just to clarify....
The left wall is planned at 20 and the right at 10.
Both wall units are 8'x8' with the corner space close to 3'x3'.

This setup, imo, wastes a lot of corner space.


This looks interesting and leaves the corner more open for stemming or an overhanging arete feature as suggested.


I will have holds and whatnot mounted on the ceiling for pull-up and hanging exercises.

Question -
Most plans call for 2x6 (or more) framing members. With my wall panels being 8x8 could I get away with 2x4 all around, or is that a bad idea?

Still open to ideas so keep em coming.
I'm comfortable with framing angles and construction, but wanna keep it somewhat simple yet interesting.

Again - THANKS for the input.


edge


Apr 15, 2012, 12:43 PM
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Re: [Sealevel] Garage Woodie Design [In reply to]
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First of all, 8' high is very limiting. However, if that's all you have room for, better than nothing.

The under vertical panels in your two latest designs are a waste of space. I would recommend going with the top design, but change the leftmost under vert panel for vertical. Connect the left and right walls with a triangular, overhanging panel. An outside arÍte will not be a practical use of space there. You can always make a separate volume to accomplish the same idea, with the added benefit of being able to move it to keep things fresh and interesting.

Also, you can get away with 2x4s since the break in the left hand wall, plus the triangular corner, will stiffen things considerably. Either double up the 2x4s or use a 2x6 behind the furthest right edge.


(This post was edited by edge on Apr 15, 2012, 1:04 PM)


Sealevel


Apr 15, 2012, 1:53 PM
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Just gonna toss these up here and sit on it a bit, have to clean up the garage anyways.




So, this one gives the 1' kick plate.
Left wall is 20 for 4' then vert to ceiling.
Right is 10 after kick plate all the way up.

The corner is open for debate and can always be completed later. Seems at this point I should focus on the left wall options.

In reply to:
First of all, 8' high is very limiting. However, if that's all you have room for, better than nothing.
Ceiling is 9' in height. All I got to work with unless I go into the attic, remove ceiling joists, etc ... way too involved.

Thanks again for the input.
Say the words "bouldering, climbing gym and campus board" down here in South Tx and people look at you funny. Ya'll are all I have for actual input on this project.


edge


Apr 15, 2012, 2:11 PM
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I still think my recommendation above is your best bet. In your last design, even with a sit start. Your hands will be on the vert wall in one move. Keeping a slight overhang will maximize your training in the limited space.

FWIW, I have designed and built two personal walls, four large walls for schools, and done a ton of design/build at my local commercial gym.


Sealevel


Apr 15, 2012, 4:23 PM
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So, in this version, the left wall has a 1' kick, a 6' 20 degree to a 2' vert to the ceiling. I could even set the vert section back a bit for a slight ledge. The right wall is the same in all versions with a 1' kick, 8' 10 degree slope to the ceiling. Tops are joined in the corner leaving an area to be framed in the corner.

Honestly, I could re-work this a zillion different ways and my brain is starting to hurt...need to take a break and stop overthinking the project.

You guys tell me what ya think. Ya'll are the experts.


guangzhou


Apr 15, 2012, 7:22 PM
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Minus the kicker plate, avoid vertical, you won't use. Even at the top of your wall.


lucky


Apr 15, 2012, 9:01 PM
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I think you will want to have a steeper wall. A 45 degree will allow for longer routes with a fixed height. Check out my pictures to see what I built. I have 55, 45, 30, 15, and 0 degree overhangs, and by far the most used are the 45 and 30 degree walls.
Also, people are always worried about stemming in a corner, but I have found that with careful route setting, this is not a real problem.


Sealevel


Apr 16, 2012, 12:29 AM
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This seems to make some good use of space and satisfy most suggestions.



Anybody wanna chime in? Again, I appreciate the opinions. Thanks for helping out a total noob.


djlachelt


Apr 16, 2012, 7:36 AM
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I think that last one is your most functional so far.

Maybe they already are (can't tell from the pic) I would make the angles of the two sides different from each other, say 10deg and 20deg.

And for the 45deg in the corner I suggest you start it lower on the wall, say 4'. If you keep the same deg that would make that section of the wall considerably larger. It would project farther into the room and would cover slightly more of the side walls, thus allowing for some longer moves.


Sealevel


Apr 16, 2012, 9:43 AM
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Yes the walls are planed at 10 and 20.

In reply to:
And for the 45deg in the corner I suggest you start it lower on the wall, say 4'. If you keep the same deg that would make that section of the wall considerably larger. It would project farther into the room and would cover slightly more of the side walls, thus allowing for some longer moves.

That does look better, thanks for the idea.


redonkulus


Apr 16, 2012, 1:50 PM
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Out of curiosity, why do you say that 10-20 degrees are the best for training? My entire wall is around 60 degrees (It was the angle of the rafters in the attic) and I've found it to be a phenomenal training tool. The only thing I feel I'm lacking is the ability to traverse or work on endurance, though a lot more jugs would likely rectify that.

Plus, with that angle, I'm able to get a 10' or 11'x16' wall with what can't be more than an 8 foot high ceiling. 15 move problems simply wouldn't be possible with that short of a ceiling and a 20 degree wall, unless they were all traverse problems.


Sealevel


Apr 16, 2012, 2:37 PM
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Before this turns into an angle debate....
I can't speak from experience, but I can tell ya'll what we're looking for.
Living in South Tx, close access to actual climbing whether indoors or out is non existent making this more recreational than practical. My wife and I are in our mid 40's with two kids 8 & 12. The adults, that's us, are in average/decent shape. Been active all our lives, just looking for something different kinda thing.

With that in mind, the angles of 10 / 20 + the center structure+the ceiling itself seems to be a good mix for everyone without being overly difficult.

If I'm wrong in this assumption, please lemme know.
Going a little steeper is no biggie.

Again, serious thanks for the input.


redonkulus


Apr 16, 2012, 8:47 PM
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Sealevel wrote:
Before this turns into an angle debate....
I can't speak from experience, but I can tell ya'll what we're looking for.
Living in South Tx, close access to actual climbing whether indoors or out is non existent making this more recreational than practical. My wife and I are in our mid 40's with two kids 8 & 12. The adults, that's us, are in average/decent shape. Been active all our lives, just looking for something different kinda thing.

With that in mind, the angles of 10 / 20 + the center structure+the ceiling itself seems to be a good mix for everyone without being overly difficult.

If I'm wrong in this assumption, please lemme know.
Going a little steeper is no biggie.

Again, serious thanks for the input.

No, for your situation, I'd say 10-20 degrees seems quite adequate. I was just wondering why that guy said it was the ideal training angle? It's quite possible, but I'd like to find out why he thinks that so I can read up on it a bit for any future improvements to my wall.

That being said, if you get big enough holds you can overcome the steep angle and have routes that aren't technically that much more difficult than on the less steep wall, but get a bit more core work out of it (perhaps) because you're nearly horizontal. It would probably be much more difficult to design as a free standing structure though.


Sealevel


Apr 16, 2012, 9:04 PM
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Think this will fit the bill. Gives me a 10 / 20 / 45 ...



THANKS for all the input and advice... pics in progress to come.


granite_grrl


Apr 17, 2012, 11:18 AM
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Sealevel wrote:
Think this will fit the bill. Gives me a 10 / 20 / 45 ...



THANKS for all the input and advice... pics in progress to come.

I think that this is on the right t

I think that this is on the right track, but I have a couple of comments (do with them what you will).

My home wall consists of a ~18ft long traverse wall at 25 degree and a steep 12ft long 60 degree wall. The 60 degree is steep, probably too steep, 45 is a better angle IMO. The 25 degree wall is not nearly as steep as you think it is, I wouldnít have anything less steep than this if don't want to get bored.

Also, when you have a wall thatís only 25 degrees steep thereís no need for a kick panel. Add one if you wish, but as I said before, 25 degrees isnít as steep as you think it is, so it really adds nothing but building complications. A kick panel will help on steeper walls though.





If you're stressed about the angles of your walls going into the future keep in mind you can always add volumes later to give greater variety to your wall.

This was our wall at another house, it was a 60 degree wall too, but the volumes gave a bit of verical realesate for mounting some hard to use holds.




climb4free


Apr 17, 2012, 11:43 AM
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Sealevel wrote:
Think this will fit the bill. Gives me a 10 / 20 / 45 ...

[image]https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-d-Q3mRqtT6k/T4zqwp_mGoI/AAAAAAAAACs/kdRx_3Hanmg/s912/wall_DONE.jpg[/image]

THANKS for all the input and advice... pics in progress to come.

I agree that the last model is the best. How the middle section creates mini aretes. I have built and designed several garage walls. Visually yours is very cool, but will involve many intricate cuts and framing tricks. If you are able, go for it. I have purposely kept mine simple.

Also, my 4 year old progressed passed my little vert section that I made specifically for him by age 2.5/3. I almost never use it. My 15* section is just about right for the smallest of commercial holds. It almost feels like its vertical now. My 30* wall is very nice.

In my next build i will have a majority being 45* with 30* being as close to vert (other than any transition walls)

So if your children really pick up on climbing, they will be ok with a bit of an angle




(This post was edited by climb4free on Jul 18, 2012, 2:05 PM)
Attachments: v3.jpg (14.9 KB)


Sealevel


Apr 17, 2012, 3:32 PM
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Thanks for the feedback.

I'm gonna do a full scale mock-up with string before I actually buy any materials. That way I can sit in the space and get a good visual feel, make any adjustments and then knock it out.

I'll look at different angles for the walls and see how it all fits in the space.


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