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timhinck


Dec 4, 2001, 9:02 PM
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High altitude climbing
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Tell me about climbing you have done at high altitude (the diamond, etc.) Tricks to ease the elevation burn? Your favorite high elevation climb? I would like to do the Grand Teton this summer... does anyone know about the routes there?


addiroids


Dec 4, 2001, 10:41 PM
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Tricks:

Don't drink any alcohol (damn!).

Stay well hydrated which leads to:

Take a leak like every 15 minutes

Get plenty of rest the first 2 days you get there.

Engage in moderate physical activity during the first 3 days at altitude. Anything more strenuous will not be as beneficial to the acclimation process. (This depends on the length of your trip)

If you are leading 5.10, get ready to hang dog on 5.7 because it will feel like 5.11.

READ some articles on AMS and HACE (internet) to be able to detect the warning signs. The Diamond is up there, and if you fly from sea level, and hit it, that is like 12,000' difference in 1 day. Not too good. So take it easy the first 3 days.

TRADitionally yours,

Addiroids


graniteboy


Dec 5, 2001, 5:42 PM
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Hey;
The diamond and altitudes like it are kinda moderate in the altitude dept, so you can sometimes get away with stuff you couldn't if you were 5,000 ft higher. But pay attention, and don't be stupid if you start exhibiting symptoms.signs of AMS.
Dr Peter Hackett wrote a short booklet on how to deal with altitude. He's prolly the most published U.S. Dr on the subject. It's called something like "Climbing at altitude". You should; eat moderately, avoid salty foods, chill out for a few days when you get to a moderately high altitude to acclimate, and climb hi sleep low. You should not:rush up to bag-your-peak-because-you-only-have-a-3-day-vacation, drink alcohol, take birth control pills (sorry, I didn't catch your gender), or become dehydrated at all. All these things will become more critical as you work your way up into higher mtn ranges.
Good luck, and may the mtn gods and dogs smile upon you.


ughmo


Apr 30, 2002, 7:44 PM
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If your coming from sea level, be sure to drink LOTS of water, eat even though you probably won't feel like it. Hike in and spend a couple days of easy hiking, bouldering, etc. to help become acclimatized. It's true that 14,000 isn't REALLY high, but for the majority of climbers in the US, it's probably as high as we'll get


kaptk


May 1, 2002, 12:57 AM
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I live at a relatively low elevation. My brother now lives outside of Denver. When he and my sister-in-law moved out there from Cleveland, I went along as part of the moving crew. We went skiing at Loveland, which is right on the Continental Divide, the day after we got out there. It wasn't a good idea. My most recent trip was during Spring Break. I drank a bunch of water and made sure that I had some moderate activity at altitude before I went skiing for an entire day. The two most important things are to drink a bunch of water and get into it slowly. It is also important to know what the signs of a problem are so that you can get down quickly. Most people won't have much of a problem at 12,000 ft., but if you are doing strenuous physical activity then it does have an impact.


stevematthys


May 1, 2002, 6:47 PM
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bring salty food, like cheezits of something. the salt will help to keep some of the water in your body so you dont dehydrate as fast


crackaddict


May 1, 2002, 7:21 PM
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When I used to backcountry snowboard it was always about hydration, and aclimitizing yourself.
Now I live in the desert at 1200ft and turn into a wheezing wuss when I get above 8000ft.

Man thats pathetic! I am going to go now.


agrauch


May 1, 2002, 8:00 PM
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Acclimatization is the key. Spend some time at "high" elevations before you go climb something. The Grand and the Diamond aren't that high in the scheme of things.

I've lived at 5000+ ft. all my life and I find it neccessary to acclimatize when spending more than a day above 12000-13000 ft. Above 12000 my heart rate goes up and I don't sleep well the first night or two. My strategy has been to spend an extra night or more getting used to it or to sleep low and climb the route in a single push. That's just me.

As far as the Grand goes, give Owen-Spalding or Upper Exum a try. Both are super easy, very long, crawling with people, and are good intro's to the Grand. There are better routes, but if you're not used to the altitude...


bradhill


May 3, 2002, 8:38 AM
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While it's not going to make that much of a difference in regards to AMS (which is completely unpredictable), don't neglect your aerobic training. Even if you don't get *sick* from the altitude, you'll still have less endurance so make sure you have plenty in reserve at low altitude. Running up hills, swimming, stairmaster and hiking with a heavy pack are good. When I'm training for Longs I (on alternate days!) put on a 30lb pack at the gym and do fifty laps on a 5.6 in two and a half hours, hike 1500' vertical gain with a 60lb pack in 2 hours round trip and run at 5000 feet as far as I expect to hike/climb at 12-14,000. Another AWESOME aerobic workout if you have little time is to run for 15 min, swim for 1/2 hour then run again for another 15 min.


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