Forums: Climbing Disciplines: Alpine & Ice:
bivy sacks
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Alpine & Ice

Premier Sponsor:

 
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


alpinerocket


Apr 28, 2003, 8:33 PM
Post #1 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 13, 2001
Posts: 496

bivy sacks
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I am looking at geting a new bivy sack and I am interested on any input. I have considered the bivys from Pika and Marmut has any one used these?John


alpinist


Apr 29, 2003, 5:42 PM
Post #2 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 5, 2003
Posts: 125

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I have used the OR Advanced bivy for the last 4 years and it has worked fine.
However, Bibler does make a really nice bivy but it is heavier if I remember correctly.
Best thing to do is to climb into a few and check out how they feel.
The pole designs are nice if you're not on a ledge, plus if you are on a ledge you can leave the poles at home.
Try the closure systems and set-up with gloves on. Don't be affraid to take time trying it out.
Also, be realistic about what you are going to be using it for. If you're going to be soloing a lot, a bivy is great. If not, only one person sleeps in a bivy with not a lot of extra room.

All that being said I love my OR bivy for pole design, weight and durability.
Good luck!


mike_ok


Apr 29, 2003, 7:22 PM
Post #3 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 21, 2003
Posts: 345

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Oware makes a great one... owareusa.com


deleted
Deleted

Apr 30, 2003, 1:13 PM
Post #4 of 35 (11097 views)
Shortcut

Registered:
Posts:

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

alpinerocket --

i've tried a number of bivies through the years and have to say that as far as a rock-bottom, minimalist sack goes, i haven't found anything to beat the rei "cyclops". it's also one of the least expensive.

for me, the best feature is that you can get in the thing, sit up, poke your face through the head opening, and have your arms outside to cook or whatever -- you look like a giant red worm with two arms, but it's fully functional. one drawback (which doesn't bother ME in the least) is that it has no pole. however, it has been my experience that the fabric, along with the stiffener on the brim, is sufficient to keep the thing off your face while sleeping.

regards,

geo


epic_ed


Apr 30, 2003, 1:42 PM
Post #5 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 4724

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Just bought a Bibler Big Wall bivy sack. Very nice. You'll probably be interested in one of their other models if you're using it for mountaineering, though. Intergral Designs bivy sacks also caught my attention for their functionality, but I went with the Bibler because of the tie-in point and undisputed quality. I've never heard anyone say they regretted buying their Bibler anything (tent, bivy sack, tarp...I'd buy dog biscuts from them if they made 'em).

All Bibler bivy sacks are tape sealed at every seam on the inside. They give you a tube of seam-seal and an applicator to coat any exposed threads on the outside. I coated mine Monday and got in it last night. Had the roommate turn on the hose and give me a solid soaking. It did leak at the zipper closure (at the very end where it meets the end of the zipper track), but this was ONLY when he focused the full stream up and under the zipper flap. Other than that, I stayed completely dry. Good elbow room in mine, too. I have the long model.

Ed


alpinerocket


Apr 30, 2003, 5:13 PM
Post #6 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 13, 2001
Posts: 496

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I have heard a lot of good things about Bibler. However, are they hard to get in with the short zipper. I have noticed some (other models) have zippers 1/2-3/4 of the way down and they look easier to get into. Or does this even matter?


vulgarian


Apr 30, 2003, 5:39 PM
Post #7 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 12, 2002
Posts: 381

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Just get the Bibler. I have had one for a long time and it works great for everything. I even use mine on back-country ski trips and stay warm as a baby. Get the long so you can stow crap in the bottom. I never have problems getting in or out of mine (even when I have to pee in the middle of the night.) Two or three times in and out and you get the system dialed. I can wake, exit, wiz, and get back in without even thinking about the task.


naturalhigh


Apr 30, 2003, 6:42 PM
Post #8 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 24, 2001
Posts: 131

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Integral designs make some killer bivy sacks

Even in the winter, I just use their Endurance bag cover and bring a small silicone-nylon tarp. Lightweight and works great.

Why get a 2.5 pound bivy when you can get a 2.5 pound tent?


jhattan


May 1, 2003, 6:27 AM
Post #9 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 15, 2001
Posts: 122

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Check out the MEC Micro Bivy. It's super cheap and I believe Integral Designs makes 'em. It's made with TegralTex, basically the same as the ToddTex that Bibler uses.


crag


May 2, 2003, 5:34 AM
Post #10 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 623

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I've used the Bibler's BWB for years now. No complaints. Yeah getting in & out of it is a little difficult but I've gotten used to it. I use it primarly in the NE where temps get below zero frequently.


weekendclimber


May 7, 2003, 8:07 PM
Post #11 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 10, 2002
Posts: 32

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I bought a MTNHRDWR Conduit SL Bivy and found out a bit of an interesting coincidence by accident. I had purchased two SlumberJack Blue Thunder 0 degree Quallofil mummy bags for $80 a piece off the web a year ago with the alternate zippers so that me and the lady could zip our bags together when we were camping (excellent idea guys!!!!). I was looking for a similiar cheap deal for a bivy bag and came across the MTNHRDWR bivy at some big name outfitter here in Seattle for just over a bill ($100 in english). Well when I finally had the chance to use it on an overnighter I found out the zipper was on the wrong side so my bag was a pain to get into and out of. I was impressed though cause it totally protected me from the weather that was pretty sleazy all night long. The thing with the Conduit Bivy is you are suppose to buy the sleeping pad and bag for another $400 and they all fit together like an expensive hotel with a crappy view. Well, when I went back to the place I got it and exchanged it for the same thing but with the zipper on the other side, I started to fiddle with it a little. Ended up being able to zip the SlumberJack bag into the bivy and it worked like they were made for each other. With a regular Thermarest stuffed into the bivy the thing wraps around a little tighter than I like, so I just use the pad on the outside of the bivy instead. The point is that I got a pretty sweet bivy getup for about two bills after tax and shipping ($200 for the layman). Just thought I would share.


Partner tim


May 7, 2003, 9:21 PM
Post #12 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 4, 2002
Posts: 4861

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Bibler crushes. I bought mine for $80 from a guy who had wrecked his shoulder in a motorcycle accident and decided to give up climbing (as opposed to motorcycling, where he was turning pro). Long story short, the thing kept me warm enough at 10,000' in Patagonia without a sleeping bag to get a good night's sleep, and that rocks.

I have a lightweight (30 degree) polargard 3D bag that works down to 0 degrees inside the bibler with a bluefoam pad, my down booties, and my belay parka. Not bad for an extra 12 oz. or so.


salami


May 7, 2003, 11:15 PM
Post #13 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 1, 2003
Posts: 128

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

i just bought the Bibler Big wall bivy, for one reason. It has a full strength tie-in loop that is weather proof. From my experience when tied in on a wall or whatever, you may get water wicking up the rope, this will make for a damp nite, why have a bivy if you are still going to get wet??? The separate tie-in loop is just what you need to keep you dry.


flypn


Apr 11, 2005, 12:00 AM
Post #14 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 8, 2002
Posts: 25

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I reccomend checking out the wild things bivy, its lighter than the bibler BWB, but has the same features and is a little easier to get in and out of to boot! perhaps best of all, its made with the new eVent fabric, which is starting to replace goretex due to greater breathability and water resistance. good luck.

link: http://www.wildthingsgear.com/bivy.html


sspssp


Apr 16, 2005, 2:03 PM
Post #15 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jan 2, 2003
Posts: 1731

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I would agree that eVent has greater breathability, but greater water proofness? I don't know about that. Goretex waterproofness is pretty hard to beat (but it doesn't breath very well compared to some of the newer fabrics).

As far as bivys go, I like my Outdoor Research bivy. It has a double zipper at the very end of the bivy sack. If it is raining (or I am cold), I can sleep on my side (which I tend to do anyways) and position the double zipper to have a small opening right in front of my mouth. This keeps the water vapor from my breath from drenching the inside of the bivy sack, but it still keeps the rain out. The double zipper means you can position it on either side. You can't do this with other bivys. I particularly don't like the zipper across the top because you can't crack it open when it is raining.


climbingnurse


Apr 16, 2005, 2:30 PM
Post #16 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 29, 2003
Posts: 420

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I just got the OR Basic Bivy. Only used it for one weekend and it didn't rain, but I like it so far. It is very minimalistic but realy does have everything you need. Only downside is that there is no tie-in built into the bag.


noshoesnoshirt


Apr 16, 2005, 5:35 PM
Post #17 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 24, 2002
Posts: 440

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I had a Wild Things wall bivy for years - tough as nails and roomy too. I recently got a Bibler big wall bivy. Tough as nails too, a bit heavier than the WT, but the tie-in sure is waterproof. The wire head-loop thingy is removable to drop some weight. My only gripe is the mosquito netting; you can't remove it completely, just bunch it up out of the way. Kinda sucks in cold conditions when you don't need it.
So, the Bibler rocks. I don't know what the new Wild Things are like but if the tie-in has been better waterproofed I'd go for it.


sethmont36


Apr 16, 2005, 6:08 PM
Post #18 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 3, 2005
Posts: 15

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

The OR Advanced Bivy is sweet. I usually use it without the poles....but its nice to have the option. So far no complaints but it is the only Bivy I have ever used.


aulwes


Apr 18, 2005, 12:13 PM
Post #19 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 26, 2001
Posts: 703

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I just bought a MOUNTAIN HARDWEAR Conduit SL Bivy, It's light weight. One downside is that I'll eventullay have to retreat the Conduit water proofing. Plus side I got it on sale and it's already a cheap bivy.


angelaa


Apr 18, 2005, 2:51 PM
Post #20 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 21, 2003
Posts: 598

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
Integral Designs Salathe
I'll 2nd [or] the vote for Integral Designs!


wetrocks


Apr 18, 2005, 5:25 PM
Post #21 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 102

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Anyone have any problems with Bivy Sack funk? I've got a single hooped bivy from Outbound that gets a lot of use. Basically my tent has been collecting dust since I got the bivy a couple of years back. I've got no complaints about this bivy except that airing it out is no longer putting a dent in the smell. I've washed it but I think the odour is now permanently in the fabric. My next course of action is to apply odour eater to the whole thing.


bittersweet_climbing


Apr 20, 2005, 6:45 PM
Post #22 of 35 (11103 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 2, 2003
Posts: 82

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I have heard that the Integral Designs and bibler are the same fabric, and design. Two guys started the ID company, and then one split, forming Bibler. Was from a quite reliable source.


crazyj


Apr 20, 2005, 7:10 PM
Post #23 of 35 (11111 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Sep 24, 2002
Posts: 38

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

I borrowed a Bibler Tripod Bivy to use on a climb in November a few years ago in RMNP. Even though the weather was fine, it did get pretty cold. I thought Bibler did a great job retaining heat and I didn't feel as cramped as I thought I would. I've owned the Bibler I-Tent and can vouch for the Toddtex fabric. I never had any significant problems with condensation, leaking, or durability. Very nice products.


cracknut


Apr 20, 2005, 7:27 PM
Post #24 of 35 (11086 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 4, 2005
Posts: 47

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

If you are going for the minimalist aproach the MTNHRDWR bivy is great. I would stay away from anything with a pole. It's too much weight and really unneccesary.


phatcat


Apr 20, 2005, 8:31 PM
Post #25 of 35 (10843 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 29, 2004
Posts: 598

Re: bivy sacks [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

just picked up an ID Sola. heavy at 3 lbs, put lighter than a tent. i will mostly use it for solo backcountry exploits next winter. i'm trying it out this weekend, hope it rains! :wink:

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Forums : Climbing Disciplines : Alpine & Ice

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook