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Slackline technicalities
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mrhardgrit


May 4, 2002, 9:04 AM
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Slackline technicalities
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Not sure which board to put this on, so I'll try here as I'm sure a fair number of you slackline.

Question - It's about falling on a slackline when doing one high, high off the ground. I've seen the pictures where they have some webbing round their waist and then attach that via a sling/length of cord to the slackline with a locker.

But....doesn't this generate a factor two fall, if you come off?? I mean, you have say 4 feet of cord and you fall 8 feet right?? How reliable is the whole system?


beyond_gravity


May 4, 2002, 11:20 AM
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Eh? I'd say your gonna get yelled at for posting in the Aid Forum...mistake!

Anyways,

I've done one highline, It was at the gym. I strong it over about a 20 foot gap between two pillars above the walls. Of course, I thought the same as you, and webbing is only rated staticly to like what, 1500 lbs? when your in the middle the force is going to be multiplying alot, along with the force of the line being tensioned in the first place. I dont trust it! I strung my rope overhead and clipped myself is a daisy and 2 locking crabs. This also give your a "chicken Line" so you can walk across with an aid to get a little more comfy. I then clipped a second tether to the webbing as a back up.

I hope that makes scence!

Slack On,
Jeremy


greyghost


May 4, 2002, 12:04 PM
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For high slacklines take inch tublar webbing and then take 5/8 webbing and string it inside. I have never had to do it before. But I was talking to Darrin Carter out in Joshua Tree when he was doing the Chongo gap near Ryan Campground and this is what he did.

PM ElCapBuzz he knows a lot about slacklining I believe.

Don't stop the scream


mrhardgrit


May 5, 2002, 1:05 AM
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Thanks for the advice guys...

Still would like to know the kind of forces generated if anyone is physics orientated....or the such like!

I was thinking that instead of threading more webbing inside of the original line, could you be belayed on dynamic rope from each end??


joemor


May 5, 2002, 1:16 AM
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someone was saying they taped a few bits of webbing together so u r walking on more like 3-4 lines.



joe


crackwhore


May 5, 2002, 5:29 AM
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 when you fall off a highline the first instinct is to catch oneself...

having said that...

keep in mind that the force generated on a fixed object (i.e. cam, bolt, manky nut etc...) is different than the force generated on an object with DEFLECTION PROPERTIES.

the longer the line, the greater. the DEFLECTION.

anyone who has walked a line understands DEFLECTION.
the line distributes the force of the fall to the anchor points.

the multiplication of the force (on the anchor points) is actually far greater than factor 2. this is why proper rigging is essential.

so much for the physics...





[ This Message was edited by: crackwhore on 2002-05-05 05:36 ]

[ This Message was edited by: crackwhore on 2002-05-05 05:37 ]


greyghost


May 5, 2002, 11:32 AM
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If you were belayed from one of the ends of a slackline then you might not hit the ground but you would pendulum into the cliff from where you were being belayed from.


Don't stop the scream


mrhardgrit


May 6, 2002, 3:00 AM
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Yeh, I know what you mean about swinging in with a pretty sizeable (and fatal?) pendulum.

But what I meant was to be belayed from both sides of the slackline. E.g. if you were doing Lost Arrow Spire, you would have someone belay you who was sitting on the spire and the other would be at the rim...

And proper rigging? Isn't it just the same as setting up a bomber belay? I.e the thing just ain't going to fall out and it takes the direction of the applied force...??


crux_clipper


May 6, 2002, 3:29 AM
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Petzl make a rope type thing for slacklining/ropewalking/via feretta.

http://www.petzl.com/petzl/publicFamille?id=ASSVF



elcapbuzz


Sep 5, 2002, 11:17 AM
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The idea is to catch the line before you whip onto the teather. You need to have experience and be an expert rigger to build a highline.

It's not the same as making a bomber belay.

Yes, huge amounts of forces are generated but you can't measure them like you can climbing. One of the reasons is because every line is different.

I don't recommend getting belayed from either side of the cliff because things can go seriously wrong (like getting one of the ropes caught around your neck and hanging yourself).

Rigging a rope above you defeats the whole purpose of why you are highlining in the first place. I imagine that's like toproping A5. It just doesn't make since.

Darrin Carter uses an 11/16" threaded through a 1". I also use this system but tape an extra 1" underneath it, only hand tight. This provides a backup and creates another knot which goes to seperate anchors.

If the line breaks it will most likely be at the knot. So, avoid having only one knot in your system.

Hope this helps. Remember highlining is serious, if something goes wrong. Death will be the outcome.

Cheers everyone, Ammon


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