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Partner taino


Aug 23, 2004, 12:59 PM
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Shockley's Ceiling - A Reckoning...
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WARNING: route beta is contained herein.

--------------------------------------------------

Nearly a year ago, towards the middle of my first climbing season, I climbed Shockley's Ceiling - a popular 5.6, three-pitch route in The Trapps. At that point in time, a 5.6 was my limit. I was seconding, and had no idea how to prusik up the line if I'd fallen; therefore, I couldn't afford to fall. Terrified, nearly crying with fear, swearing the air warm around me, I somehow managed to pull through the crux, even though I partially dislocated my wrist in the attempt.

Since then, I've been up the first two pitches several times to sit at the p2 belay and watch people pull the move over the roof. I've talked to people who had climbed it, and gleaned the gear beta. I had visualized it, memorizing the moves so that I could do them in my sleep. I'd progressed in my climbing ability to the point where I could lead 5.7.

This past Friday, I took the day off from work to stage an assault on Shockley's Ceiling. I hadn't made another attempt on it since that terrified flailing a year ago. This time, however, I was going to lead it.

My partner and I climbed the Stairmaster to get directly to the bottom of Shockley's without having to waste any time. The day was unbelieveably humid, and we were soaked with sweat before we'd even started; the rock felt warm to the touch, and had a tendency to be greasy if there was any chalk build-up on holds. Pitches one and two fell quickly, however, and in about 1.5 hours we were both up at the p2 belay ledge and ready to go. With my partner on belay, I cast off - moving carefully but surely over to the crack that runs the rest of the way up the route, through the infamous ceiling and onward. I placed a solid green camalot as my first piece, then moved up and clipped the (single) bong piton under the ceiling with a 4' runner. I backed up the piton with two aliens, then put the all-important #2 camalot in the ceiling crack as close to the point as I could reach; I even jammed a hand in the crack to be able to lean out further and get that #2 into the optimum spot. I backed off, collected myself, caught my partner's eye one last time, and it was time.

Right hand jam into the crack...

Move the feet onto the small holds that put you in reach of the next handhold...

Lean WAY out, reeeeeaaaach high with the left hand for the ledge you can't see...

Got it... match the hands, move your feet up slightly, twist to the left, and reach with your right hand to the "Thank God" jug...

The "Thank God" jug was covered in chalk.

The chalk had turned to slime, in the humidity.

I tried to make it go, gripping the jug in different ways, but I couldn't get any purchase. I could feel myself weakening, and decided - with the remains of my waning strength - to downclimb back under the ceiling and regroup. Slow, controlled, scary... safe.

I stood there, balanced carefully as my heartrate returned from the stratosphere, and discussed my options with my partner. She's seen what had happened (had a great view, in fact), and suggested I give it another try. I agreed. My plan of attack would be to try to get a hand- or fist-jam in that crack next to the jug, and use that instead...

The rock was slick from the humidity, and the chalk residue had built up to the point where the entire area was covered with slime. I tried slotting my hand in the crack behind a constriction - a dangerous thing, as if I fell I'd leave my hand/arm behind - but even that didn't work. I tried my best to heat up the air with as many curses as I could, in hopes to dry out the paste... no luck. I could feel my arms starting to pump out, and downclimbed back to safety just in time.

Mayhem ensued. Epithets ripped the air, skin was broken by the harsh rock; it gave me the impetous to try one more time. I'd noticed another jug above the one for which I'd been reaching; I though I could get to it, and use it instead. Once more...

I was - literally - three inches too short. For the life of me, I couldn't reach it. I strained, struggled, cursed, grunted like a Cape Buffalo in rut, did an impressive rendition of a pissed-off silverback, and finally realized that I'd better climb back down unless I wanted to fall. I barely made it.

I was completely shelled. My hands had no strength, and my mind was blank. The downclimb back to the belay ledge was one of the hardest things I've done on rock. I put myself back on safety, clipped into the anchor directly, sat down, and started to shake. I'd never been so sure I was going to fall, and it was only through sheer determination and adrenaline that I didn't.

My partner had said that she'd give it a shot on the off-chance that I couldn't do it. I'm stronger, but she is a much better climber than I, technique-wise; she leads 5.10b sport, follows 5.10a trad, etc. I freely admit that she can climb rings around me. Seeing me there on the belay ledge, shaking, eyes vacant... she remarked "okay, I'm getting a little nervous."

We switched ends of the rope, re-sorted gear, and she cast off onto the sharp end with nary a blink. This would be cake, for her.

Up she went, rechecked the gear I'd placed (standard operating procedure), and began the sequence...

The jug was no better for her than it was for me. She tried jamming, she tried reaching the next jug (she has a wider reach than I), she tried different foot placements. She tried technique and brute strength separately and in series and parallel. She tried cursing, she tried yelling, she tried grunting; as if from far away, I thought I heard a sailor profess his undying admiration for her. In the end, though, there was no way up. While attempting to downclimb, she slipped - and with a scream like a kettle at full boil, she took her first lead fall. As if in slow motion, I saw her watch detach from her wrist and soar, free, into the afternoon sky. The gear was bomber, and I was prepared; she didn't fall far. Her watch, however, disappeared from sight.

After catching her breath and expressing her opinion of Bill Shockley, his kin, and his possible failings in bed, my partner collected herself and made another attempt. It proved to be as fruitless as the first, resulting in another lead fall - this time, with some gear on her gear sling catching in the quickdraw under the roof. If I hadn't been keeping the rope close, she might have been injured. As it was, she decided to stop while still unhurt.

She downclimbed and cleaned the gear as she went, then joined me on the belay ledge. We rested, and climbed out on Shockley's Without (no ceiling). We found her watchband at the base of the cliff; the watch itself, however, was gone. Not even a scrap of metal to be found.

Damn that route. Someday... someday I'll get it.

T

Reposted due to numerous requests.


dingus


Aug 23, 2004, 1:15 PM
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Now taino, you know that the chalk-mess theory was/is a copout, right?

Don't feel bad, we all do it. But if you had just cranked like a disease you would have sent the lead, chalk or no chalk. You doubted yourself and let chalk slime be your excuse for not trying it.

Itschool though. Like I said, we all do it. You'll get Shockley's, you'll see. Do you know anything of Shockley, by the way? The man? Interesting dude, quite controversial.

Cheers
DMT


Partner taino


Aug 23, 2004, 1:27 PM
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Now taino, you know that the chalk-mess theory was/is a copout, right?

Don't feel bad, we all do it. But if you had just cranked like a disease you would have sent the lead, chalk or no chalk. You doubted yourself and let chalk slime be your excuse for not trying it.

How incredibly insightful. :roll:

There's one hold. It's a rounded side-pull. It was covered with the equivalent of slime. If it's dry, it's bomber. If it's not, it's useless. If the weather hadn't been so humid (as to make the chalk residue paste), I would have had it easily.

Try the route, sometime, in similar conditions. Until then, please be aware that you're talking out your arse.

T


jimthespider


Aug 23, 2004, 1:29 PM
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Funny story...
I climbed Shockley's back in the mid 90's with a buddy. We were in New Paltz for a 4 day weekend and ended up tying one on Friday night in town. Woke up early Sat, heads were hurting, and before I knew it I had led the 1st two pitches. Gavin wasn't looking to good and to my surprise he tossed his cookies at the large belay ledge just under the real climbing. We rapped! Came back the next day and I lead the crack. I only remember one brief moment of indecision then I pulled the roof and were were heading back to the pub.
We managed to climb a ton of classic 5.6 - 5.8's and we didn't even own cams. Everything on nuts, hexes and rusted, manky pitons.

Wearing a watch while climbing?! Does she wear hoop earrings, bangles and rings too? I always see people wearing jewelry or watches and I just laugh to myself...


robmcc


Aug 23, 2004, 1:32 PM
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Try the route, sometime, in similar conditions. Until then, please be aware that you're talking out your arse.

I think it's an east coast/left coast thing. 5.6 on the east coast would be what, 5.10 on the left?

Why yes, I am trolling my climbing elders...

Rob


curt


Aug 23, 2004, 1:37 PM
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Now taino, you know that the chalk-mess theory was/is a copout, right?

Don't feel bad, we all do it. But if you had just cranked like a disease you would have sent the lead, chalk or no chalk. You doubted yourself and let chalk slime be your excuse for not trying it.

Itschool though. Like I said, we all do it. You'll get Shockley's, you'll see. Do you know anything of Shockley, by the way? The man? Interesting dude, quite controversial.

Cheers
DMT

If you want a very interesting perspective on the guy, read a relatively new book called Crystal Fire.

Curt


tradmanclimbs


Aug 23, 2004, 1:37 PM
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Not. Shocklys really aint too bad if you know how to hand jam


Partner polarwid


Aug 23, 2004, 1:38 PM
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AHHHHHH...SHOCKLEY'S...

http://www.rockclimbing.com/...mp.cgi?Detailed=3167


http://www.rockclimbing.com/...mp.cgi?Detailed=8542


dingus


Aug 23, 2004, 2:09 PM
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Until then, please be aware that you're talking out your arse.

T

Duly noted. Thank you.

You seem to have deleted reference to your TR. Why? Your post alludes to 'advanced stupidity.' May I assume that to mean you were incredibly stupid to have thought your TR would get supportive attention?

Well, taino, it DID get supportive attention. I told you the truth, arse or not. AND I was nice about it.

DMT


atg200


Aug 23, 2004, 2:14 PM
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true that. i lead shockleys pitch 3 in a huge rainstorm once. very exciting but it was fine, and i flail on anything harder than 5.8 at the gunks.

the whole east coast vs west coast thing is tired and untrue. durrance on devils tower is way harder than shockleys, and that is just one example of an area classic. i've been a local at the gunks, the black hills, colorado, and utah - and the trad ratings all feel about the same to me.


dr.ed
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I've climbed on both the left and right side of the country... for over 30 yrs with at least 15 in the 'Gunks from the mid 70's through early 90's, and in Yosemite Valley for about 8 yrs, and lots of places in between. If you want to see bizarre right side flailing go over and watch people whine that Ken's Crack is a sandbag... or even Baby... a typically for the 'Gunks these are crack climbs. The 5.2 overhang on Easy Overhang is thought of skeptically on the "left side" of the country, how could an overhang be as easy as 5.2? Similarly, Jam Crack in the Valley is 5.6, but the amount of "right side" skin which is sacrificed to it is incredible.

Shockley's is a great 5.6 'Gunks roof... not technically hard but a psych. I actually think the steep stuff above the roof is the technical crux.

Most memorable Shockley's moment: a team cam cruising up, just under the roof one guy says to the other, "you should chalk your calf for the move just after you pull the roof"... they were both soloing, one guy had never done it before!

It is heavily travelled, and I can believe that chalk use can make a mess in the sticky humidity that is summer in the 'Gunks. Maybe things are worse now, but I could never have claimed not to be able to do a climb there because of the solidity of the chalky holds.

Ed Hartouni


darth_gaydar


Aug 23, 2004, 3:35 PM
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Shockley was a prominent rascist. Of course this was overshadowed by his Nobel prize......

Did you know he bailed (Shockley's Without) and did not do the ceiling on his first try? True. He came back later to finish it.


ambler


Aug 23, 2004, 3:42 PM
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One day, Tai, when you actually climb as much as you talk, you'll realize how comical your posts are. Shockley's gets soloed in the rain, frequently.
Ack!
Tico, yah Slimed him.


darth_gaydar


Aug 23, 2004, 3:58 PM
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Shockley's gets soloed in the rain, frequently.

No it does not.


threadkilla


Aug 23, 2004, 4:13 PM
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Tai, I read your post before you deleted it. I think you should re-post it, it was a good story. Whatever possessed you to try that last Friday? I was bathed in sweat just standing still. I bet it is easier in the rain once the slime washes off.
The moves through that roof really kinda suck. It's hard to do it gracefully and I'll admit to losing some skin on my knee. The climb gets it's reputation from the exposure and commitment, so as a beginning leader I give you a lot of credit for even attempting it. You'll get it next time. Rock on Dude :D :D :D


mwbtle


Aug 24, 2004, 7:20 AM
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You want to know what I think?
I know you don't, since I'm a comical whiny little gumby newb myself.
but I also have a big mouth so I'm going to tell you anyway.

I think it was a good TR.

sure, he wasn't climbing 5.13.
and sure he had trouble with something that people solo in the rain.

but it was still a good trip report: well written, emotional, interesting.

I don't think climbing level really has any real association with self-worth. and it shouldn't.
but what do I know? I flail on easy stuff.
guess that makes me dung to be scraped off other people's shoes, eh?

get a life people, he wanted to share his personal triumphs and defeats with you all. you didn't have to read it.


robmcc


Aug 24, 2004, 8:41 AM
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I think it was a good TR.

So do I. I enjoyed reading it. I've climbed in the Gunks, but I never did Shockley's, and truth be told, I wouldn't get past a slimy hold like that either.

In reply to:
and sure he had trouble with something that people solo in the rain.

I'm a bit of a skeptic on that. I climb in the rain. I climb in sleet, snow, and f'n cold. Damn few people are on the rock in the rain, or sleet, or snow, or cold. I know the Gunks is popular, but I have a hard time seeing _anything_ get soloed frequently in the rain. I won't say it doesn't happen, but I'd sure like to see it. 'Sides, wet rock is way grippier than slimy rock.

Personally, I'm all for seeing moderate trad TRs. If I wanted to read about high end craziness, I can go pay $5 and do so. Let's hear from people like me, or people who climb a little harder. Or not as hard, though there can't be many. :P

Rob


dingus


Aug 24, 2004, 8:53 AM
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Tai, I read your post before you deleted it. I think you should re-post it, it was a good story.

I totally, 100% agree. It is a well written story and was a pleasure to read. I hope you post more.

DMT


dingus


Aug 24, 2004, 8:58 AM
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'Sides, wet rock is way grippier than slimy rock.

I learned to climb in Tennessee.

DMT


ben87


Aug 24, 2004, 8:59 AM
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Hey -- I'd love to read more moderate trip reports.

Can everybody chill? -- DMT's comment read like typical good natured ribbing to me, and Taino, you seemed to have a pretty touchy reaction. Maybe there's something in the original TR to explain your reaction, but I don't know.

-+-

I seconded that pitch of Shockleys (we traversed over from Strictly, I think) in June (great weather!). My leader found it very committing and psychological. In the end he had to trust his (bomber) pro and just commit to it. I found it to be very stiff climbing as well (and yes, followed by some fairly tricky face climbing) -- the most interesting and scary part, I thought, was that you had to commit yourself into a precarious position from which it would be hard to retreat without falling in order to really test the moves.


shakylegs


Aug 24, 2004, 9:02 AM
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The two bongs under the roof also help make the pro bomber. Damn, I'm sorry I missed the TR.


tico


Aug 24, 2004, 9:25 AM
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In reply to:
In reply to:
I think it was a good TR.

So do I. I enjoyed reading it. I've climbed in the Gunks, but I never did Shockley's, and truth be told, I wouldn't get past a slimy hold like that either.

In reply to:
and sure he had trouble with something that people solo in the rain.

I'm a bit of a skeptic on that. I climb in the rain. I climb in sleet, snow, and f'n cold. Damn few people are on the rock in the rain, or sleet, or snow, or cold. I know the Gunks is popular, but I have a hard time seeing _anything_ get soloed frequently in the rain. I won't say it doesn't happen, but I'd sure like to see it. 'Sides, wet rock is way grippier than slimy rock.

Rob

If you're climbing in the gunks on a rainy (and i don't mean downpour, just your usual summer rain; not the third-world monsoons we've had this year) you'll probably see someone soloing around the easier steep routes. Shockley's stays fairly dry in a light rain. It's always pretty slimy because it's one of the easy classics of the gunks; this makes it a little trickier, but no more so than the polish on popular eldo routes. If you want to see some rainy soloing, come on up, I know a great circuit that's relatively moderate and very fun. Lots of people solo a lot around here, the routes are great for it.

And I'm not bashing Tai for flailing on Shockley's, I'm bashing him for giving external excuses for flailing, then getting huffy about it. Failing (flailing, falling) is a big part of climbing, but it's more productive to accept resposibility for the failure than to spray about how the rock was too chalky (welcome to the gunks. don't like it? climb at millbrook more often.) or wet, etc.


dalguard


Aug 24, 2004, 1:20 PM
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I rarely see people soloing at the Gunks. In the rain, I've seen it never.


darth_gaydar


Aug 24, 2004, 1:26 PM
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I rarely see people soloing at the Gunks. In the rain, I've seen it never.

Agreed....unless it happens to be Jason1. I have seen him free solo 5.10 in the rain ( Slightly Roddey).


edge


Aug 24, 2004, 2:09 PM
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I would have loved to read the TR, Taino.

As for soloing Shockleys in the rain, I know that in the late 70's and early 80's it was done routinely after a rain. The amount of booty gear from retreating parties was was a major coup for certain dirtbag climbers.

The last time I did it was mid 80's with an old girl friend (no, she wasn't 82 years old, you know what I mean) who routinely climbed 5.9's. She couldn't make a reach over the roof (5'3") and I had to walk her through the finer points of aid climbing off of over-the-shoulder slings from the fixed gear. It's no gimme at the grade.

Cheers Tai, for trying. You'll get it next time.

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