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Overhang Pictures
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verticallaw


Jun 10, 2002, 1:36 PM
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Overhang Pictures
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O.K. so I'm out with the crew climbing and we get to a massive roof.... Cool I say I'm going to station in and get some shots. Unfortrunatly I could not menouver myself to aim at the spots I wanted comfortably. My station would not allow me the flexibility and when I extended the station slings it was too akward and hanging from my station chains in the rope while on belay left me spinning like a top arggggggggg! Any tips on how to avoid this as we will be going out there again soon. Also I found that due to the light the shots came out very dark (not much sunlight under a roof eh?). Any thoughts would be great!!!

Cheers
Mike


kelownaclimber


Jun 10, 2002, 2:09 PM
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He..he.. welcome to the world of climbing photography.
The best way I've found to shoot overhangs is to get quite a bit over to the side and shoot from there thus getting the angle and having adaquate light.Good luck on the next try,it usually takes me a few shoots to find good angles,etc. but that's what you get when you are an amateur....or am I just imcompetent???


Partner tim


Jun 11, 2002, 6:30 AM
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Bring a flash for fill, if you're getting dark shots it is probably because of the meter trying to expose the sky properly. As for angles, every trick you can think of has been tried and will be tried; the most successful seem to involve a boom or a static rap line... alternatively you could look for a tripod to sling and use as a "crutch". It will be hard to avoid spinning if you're free-hanging and don't have an object to place against the rock (one more reason why guys like Epperson put up with huge booms).

It's an awful lot easier to take good pictures if you're not also involved in belaying! I hope by "stationed in" you just meant anchored in, and not also belaying.



[ This Message was edited by: jabbeaux on 2002-06-11 06:32 ]


verticallaw


Jun 11, 2002, 8:42 AM
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Yea I was anchored in but I was still on belay meaning that My buddy was down below holding my rope.....Just in case When I spoke of resting on belay I unhitched My anchors and just used My lead line so that I could be lowered away from the roof slightly. Taking pictures while belaying someone could be a disasterous epic... Ya might not stop them from falling but you could get a shot of them spinning off into the abys so you could explain to their families what happened."ahh well I was holding the rope but I saw a great photo op that involved this big bird in the sky and when I looked back he was gone. Can't figure out what happened but here's the look on his face as he fell (notice the finger) so ahhh sorry" . Naaaaa couldn't do that.

Cheers ( and not on belay)
Mike


saltspringer


Jun 12, 2002, 10:56 PM
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time of day is always crucial in the photo game so try and figure out if early morning or late evening sun gets under the roof at all. The lower angle light is warmer and produces softer shadows and even illumination of your subject but if it's a great shot you're after you may have to get up early or stay out late!


trommater


Jun 17, 2002, 11:33 AM
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Sheck out these web sites. They offer info on the proper use of fill-flash. Using fill flash is the only way you will get the proper exposure of the climber and also the proper exposure for the sky and background.

Dan


http://www.photographytips.com/page.cfm/1532

http://www.popphoto.com/Camera/ArticleDisplay.asp?ArticleID=27




Partner philbox
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Jul 25, 2002, 5:52 PM
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   I`ve found that when I`m shooting overhangs I like to be on two ropes both of which are fixed at the top. The ropes are positioned apart from each other so that as I`m abseiling down to take up my position below the lip I will not be spinning on only one rope. The two ropes act to prevent me spinning.

Another tip for positioning is to get yourself a couple Petzl aid hooks and a couple of Metolius adjustable daiseys. These things I find invaluable for hooking myself into position and the twin rope abseil is awesome for a feeling of security so that I can concentrate on the piccy taking.

I use a Gri Gri for my main abseil device and either a shunt or some other self locking device on the other rope. Getting yourself set up with some sort of belay seat is an advantage as well, this will counter the effects of harness hang syndrome.

...Phil...


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