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barc


Aug 5, 2002, 4:14 PM
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I'm going to graduate school in about a year and am trying to figure out where I want to go. Let's say you're trying to wiegh good grad school (in physics) vs. good local climbing. Where would you go. It's a tough choice, lot's of options. Anyone got any comments?


rocknpowda


Aug 5, 2002, 4:28 PM
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I am not sure how good their grad school is in Physics, but you can't beat the climbing (or the skiing) around the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah. Check it out, I know they have a good medical school and other grad programs.


sinorock


Aug 5, 2002, 4:34 PM
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The physics dept. of Cornell is quite good.
Cornell has a gym with natural rocks. They boast that it is the biggest and highest natural rock wall east of Mississippi. I know the climb club there is pretty active.
They organize trips to the gunks and the new river.

Jane, PhD


bradhill


Aug 5, 2002, 4:40 PM
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The University of Colorado at Boulder has a world class physics program (multiple Nobel laureates on faculty, lots of industry support, etc.) and is second to none for the proximity of the University to great climbing of all stripes.


Really, though... I know climbing is important, but graduate level work in physics is an extremely competitive, important and difficult proposition that will determine your career. You're talking years of investment that will determine a lot of the course of your life. Just getting admitted anywhere into a graduate physics program is hard enough -- if you're going to compromise your choices over climbing then maybe you should seek a different career path.


spydermonkey


Aug 5, 2002, 4:44 PM
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climbing....

spydermonkey

P.S. j/k school is the more important of the two.


sinorock


Aug 5, 2002, 4:45 PM
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I agree with Bradhill. The strongest area of CU's phy dept. is the low temp. phy.
Check this out:
http://physics.colorado.edu/research/index.html

Jane, PhD


tcollins


Aug 5, 2002, 4:49 PM
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Not that I know much about physics, but I have a good friend who is attending the University of Boulder. It must be a good program as I know he is very intelligent. I think he had the same decision you do as he is also strong climber. He is truly loving it out there. Hope this helps a tad.


aarong


Aug 5, 2002, 4:51 PM
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Germany.


bolder


Aug 5, 2002, 5:25 PM
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CU in Boulder. Good School, Year round climbing of all types. Flagstaff is five minutes from campus and is a good place to get in sessions between classes.


barc


Aug 5, 2002, 8:29 PM
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Come on, physics is hard and competive, BUT one can climb and do well in physics. Watch out for giving off that naive undergraduate tone, eh?


biggernhell


Aug 5, 2002, 8:42 PM
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I'd go with CU Boulder. The Uof U is nice, but they've just passed a law that requires sixty hours of consecutive in state college credit ot two years of consecutive in state employment before you qualify for resident tuition. So unless your a Utah resident or independantly wealthy I would suggest stearing clear of the U of U. I'm going to abandon ship myself after this fall, and I'm pretrty sure I'll end up in Boulder as well.


bradhill


Aug 6, 2002, 8:50 PM
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Well, I got my undergrad years ago and my kid brother just got his undergrad in physics at CU. I know plenty of grad students in physics, math, biology, history and other fields. Their graduate education is the most arduous and important investment they've ever made in their life and future. I'm not saying you can't climb well and do good research - I'm saying that if you're going to invest 5 or more years of your life, a ton of money and an incredible amount of work (don't think it'll be anywhere close to as easy as undergrad) in grad school, getting into the best school with the exact program and mentor you want should be your main priority. Choosing a physics grad school based on climbing is like choosing what doctor you want to perform an extremely difficult and life-saving operation based on how close the hospital is to a Krispy Kreme because you really like doughnuts and you figure you'll be in recovery for a couple of weeks.


bolder


Aug 6, 2002, 9:44 PM
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What's wrong with wanting to have fun while in school. If you can't enjoy your life then what is the point of doing anything?


peas


Aug 6, 2002, 10:07 PM
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I'd like to comment on what bradhill said earlier. Last year I was facing the same situation(even down to the physics part of things) that barc is right now. I chose to go to a school that had the exact physics program that I wanted, but Toronto is not so strong with the extra curricular activities that I'm interested in. I've struggled through school for the past year because I couldn't balance my school life with the rest of my life. I've decided to only get a Master's instead of a PhD and am moving back to Vancouver so that I can lead a more balanced life. So I don't think the doctor/krispy kreme analogy is correct, because what you do with your spare time at school really effects how much you enjoy life. Some people can thrive on school alone, but I found out that I'm not one of those people. I realize that bradhill said that finding the right school should be a main priority, not the only consideration, but I'm saying that you should carefully consider how important each aspect of your life is before making the big decision.

[ This Message was edited by: peas on 2002-08-06 15:08 ]


fisaacs


Aug 8, 2002, 6:32 PM
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I think I heard once that some of the california schools aren't too bad on climbing. Really depends on the branch of phy. you're looking to get into, and what activity you're dedicated to. Sure, MIT doesn't have much climbing nearby, but its frikkin MIT! At the same time, I'm sure you could study physics somewhere near el cap if you were willing to go to such a school. balance is the key here. would you rather feel the force exerted to climb the wall, or calculate the impact force when you fall back down it in your mind during the split seconds before you hit?


rock_diva


Aug 8, 2002, 8:13 PM
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Arizona State University!! Actually, I have no info about their physics department. I'm just partial to ASU because I go to grad school there, and there's lots of great climbing in AZ.


rmiller


Aug 9, 2002, 5:33 AM
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People are right when they say you should place the emphasis on a good school over climbing! It will be your career for life, so make it a good experience while gaining a quality education. That said, there are numerous good physics departments in states where there is excellent climbing, so apply to all of those programs. Make it so no matter which one you get into, you will be happy. That is the most important factor!!! However, don't limit yourself. If you really like a program, go for it, even if it is in a semi-ok or no climbing area. CU Boulder is an excellent choice, but I am sure there are other places with both climbing and good departments.

Also, don't think you have to quit climbing just for school. I went to grad school in LA, a place with ok climbing close by and great climbing within driving distance. I spent five years in grad school and increased my sport climbing from 11a to 13b and my trad from 10a to 5.12. The trick is to bust your butt during the week so your weekends are free. It will be hard, but you have to have some balance in life. So bust it during the week and climb on the weekends. Try to make it into a gym once a week to destress and get strong. Good luck!
Ronnie


apollodorus


Aug 9, 2002, 5:50 AM
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Uh, what about Stanford? It's only a couple of hours away from Yosemite, Lover's Leap, Kings Canyon, etc. Cal Tech is further from Yosemite, but is fairly close to Joshua Tree.


krustyklimber


Aug 9, 2002, 6:43 AM
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University of Washington here in Seattle has an excellent Physics dept.
And we have some of the worlds best mountaineering, and rockclimbing of almost as high of quality right here in our backyard!

Give it a look.

Jeff


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