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climb_eng


Aug 20, 2007, 9:03 PM
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The RC.com Cookbook
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I want to hear everyone's favorite recipes!

Heres mine:

JP's Chicken Thing

Ingredients:

- 1 pouch of shake and bake (southern fried)
- 1 large chicken breast (boneless, skinless)
- 1/2 cup of Frank's Hot Sauce
- 1/2 cup Diana Sauce BBQ Sauce (Chicken & Rib).
- 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil.
- 1 cup sticky rice

Directions:

- Cut the chicken into small chunks (~ 1"X1"X1/2")
- Stir the chicken chunks together in the bowl with the hot sauce and BBQ sauce. Allow the chicken to marinate for ~ 2 hrs.
- Prepare the rice using your favorite method.
- Bread the chicken using the shake and bake, pour the excess shake and bake in with the coated chicken chinks.
- Fry the chicken in the olive oil on a frying pan (med heat) for 10 minutes.
- Stir the chicken in with the rice. Add any other vegetables and such in with the rice of flavor.

Enjoy, preferably with a pint of cold beer.


climber49er


Aug 20, 2007, 9:22 PM
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Re: [climb_eng] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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Climber49ers Wicked Awesome Dessert recipe:

Obtain one large bar of dark chocolate
Open it
Eat it


NSFW


Aug 20, 2007, 9:31 PM
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Re: [climb_eng] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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Is this suppose to be for camping recipes or anything?

I look forward to learning some tasty, easy, recipes.

Alas, I can't share anything except my patented power breakfast:

Ingredients
6-pack of Guiness

Remove bottles from cooler one at a time. Open, imbibe, repeat.


slablizard


Aug 20, 2007, 9:51 PM
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Re: [NSFW] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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Why camping? You never cook at home? Ahh Americans! ;)

PASTA ALLA CARBONARA
(Carbonara's pasta)

bacon
Eggs
Olive oil
Parmesan cheese
pasta (short pasta like "penne" is better)
Pepper
Salt

Put the water on the fire, add salt in the water

mix the eggs, I use one egg for each person.

In a separate pan set a little olive oil and fry the chopped bacon,

you will need REAL LEAN bacon, (pancetta) not the tipe used for American breakfast it looks like this


When I use regular US bacon I throw away 80% of it...the white fat part and keep just the meat.

when the water boils put the pasta in, keep an eye on the cooking time 7 minutes is usually enough..."al dente" means that the pasta is almost crunchy, and doesn't stick. no stlicky stuff that's chinese noodles, not pasta.

mix parmesan cheese with the eggs and add some pepper, someone adds milk to make it more creamy. I don't.

Take the pasta out when it's done, drain it and put it in the LARGE pan you used for the bacon, stir it on the fire a bit.

As an alternative you can use the pot you just used to boil the pasta, pour the olive oil and the bacon over, start mixing and add the eggs, with the fire still on.

The eggs are supposed to cook a bit within the hit pasta itself, but not completely.

Add a bit of olive oil if it's too dry.
Serve and eat warm, before the eggs dry out.

Learn how to twist your fork and eat spaghetti, pick a little and twist the fork around, make small bites...AND DON"T LET ME SEE YOU USING A SPOON or worst cutting the pasta...
You can use short pasta instead of spaghetti.

Red wine or beer...a go-go
Perfect after a long climbing day...trust me. Wink

A final long burp will express your appreciation.

Enjoy!


Spaghetti alla Carbonara literally means "Spaghetti in the Manner of the Charcoal Maker". Some believe that the dish was once popular with Charcoal makers who lived on the Mountains near Rome because the ingredients were easily portable and cooking was fairly uncomplicated. Others believe the dish derives its name from all the freshly ground pepper that is added to the spaghetti at the last minute. Actually, the origin of the dish is quite recent, since it was unknown before Second World War. The dish uses pancetta or guanciale, which are similar to bacon. If you want to stay true to the Roman heritage of the dish, you must use grated Pecorino Romano cheese, but it can be substituted by Parmesan. A mix of the two cheeses is also common.

Most Anglo-American recipes add cream to the dish.[1][2] This is not how the original Roman/Italian dish is made, however.[3]

http://en.wikibooks.org/...hetti_alla_Carbonara


(This post was edited by slablizard on Aug 20, 2007, 10:20 PM)


wjca


Aug 20, 2007, 9:53 PM
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Re: [NSFW] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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Goombay Smash

2 oz orange juice
2 oz pineapple juice
2 oz cocunut rum
2oz light rum
2 drops Angostura Bitters (optional, but it really makes the drink. I found it at the grocery store near the club soda)

Mix together and pour over ice in a tall glass. Garnish with orange wedge and cherry. Repeat. Get numb.

Or if you want to impress your lady or metrosexual friend:

Goombaytini

1.5 oz orange juice
1.5 oz pineapple juice
1.5 oz cocunut rum
1.5 oz light rum
2 drops Angostura Bitters (optional, but it really makes the drink. I found it at the grocery store near the club soda)

Add to martini shaker with handful of ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wedge and cherry. Repeat. Get numb.

And if you want to change your lattitude, offer along with some red stripes (or Kalik Gold if you can find it and actually give a damn about your guests), and serve with Jerked chicken, coconut shrimp, rice, roasted sweet potato, maybe a jicama slaw salad, and if you can find it, some conch fritters. Damn I need another vacation.


(This post was edited by wjca on Aug 20, 2007, 9:55 PM)


dr_feelgood


Aug 20, 2007, 10:25 PM
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Re: [wjca] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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Butterfly meat. Stuff meat with tasty shit. Roll and Tie meat. Baste with some sort of sauce. Grill along with veggies. Put on plate with starch like potatos, couscous or rice. Devour with fermented/distilled liquid.
Pass out in food coma.


reno


Aug 20, 2007, 10:41 PM
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Re: [climb_eng] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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climb_eng wrote:
I want to hear everyone's favorite recipes!

A slab of ribs and side of rum beans at Fatt Matt's Rib Shack in Atlanta, GA, notwithstanding, here's mine:

1 Eggplant
1 Yellow squash
1 Zucchini
1 Yellow onion
1 can diced tomatos
2 cups rice
1 clove garlic
Salt, pepper, EV Olive oil

Dice eggplant, yellow squash, zucchini, and onion.

Sautee in olive oil and garlic over medium heat until just soft.

Add diced tomatos, lower heat, warm throughout.

Cook rice during this, according to directions.

Pour eggplant/tomato/zucchini mixture over rice.

Salt and pepper to taste, serve.


themadmilkman


Aug 21, 2007, 1:30 AM
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Re: [slablizard] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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slablizard wrote:
pasta (short pasta like "penne" is better)

SHORT pasta? Never on a carbonara! You need a long, thick pasta, like a fettucine or a linguine, if not thicker.

Also, certain regions in Italy add cream to the dish as well.


Partner macherry


Aug 21, 2007, 1:59 AM
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this isn't my recipe, it's from iwishiwaswest, a user no longer hanging around rc.com. She sent it to me in a pm, which i will post. It very funny. I followed her directions and definitely had a good buzz going. Very delicious!!

STEW!!!!

Make sure you really brown the meat and veggies - you need to let them cook and keep stirring until they get a real deep golden brown - this gives the stew a great, earthy flavour.

Also plan on a whole afternoon and at least 1 bottle of good full bodied red wine - you'll need 2 cups for the stew (or more) and at least 2 glasses (or more) to sip!

Chop up everything at the beginning so it's ready to add when you need to - you don't want to let this stew cook down too much and get too thick while you're chopping up stuff!

STUFF YOU NEED

2 lbs. boneless veal shoulder (or boneless beef round or mixture of both) cut into 1 inch cubes - no fat

4 tablespoons all-purpose flour

4 tablespoons olive oil

1 large Vidalia or yellow onion, cut into 1" wedges

4 garlic cloves, minced (I up this to 6 - love garlic)

2 cups baby peeled carrots - I leave them whole but you can chop them if you like - if you chop them use 1 cup

1 cup sliced celery - again, I cut big hunks - I like my stew chunky - if you use big hunks, go 2 cups

2 cups full bodied Red wine (for the stew - more for you!)

2 cups homemade beef stock or beef broth (if you must)

1 cup V-8 juice

1 cup tomato sauce

2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano

1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyne

2 bay leaves

1-1/2 tsps. salt

1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper

8 ozs. mushrooms (Ilike the brown Crimini ones) trimmed and again I use big chunks

1 can (13 ozs.) Artichoke hearts - I like the roasted ones. Drain them and halve them if they are really big

8 ozs. asparagus cut into 2" lengths

4-5 peeled potatoes cut into chunks

1 cup freshly shelled peas

3 tablespoons of parsley for garnish

If you can't find some of the veggies, then just substitute whatevers in season and FRESH - green beans, okra, whatever

1) While sipping wine, put the meat cubes in a bag with the flour and shake well to coat the meat. You'll need at least a 6 quart (litre) saucepan. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium-high heat. Brown the meat on all sides - this should take aboput 10 minutes to get the good browning. The pan should be hot enough that the meat (and later the veggies) are sizzling but not hot enough to burn or stick. Once well-browned, remove meat. Drink more wine.

2) Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and add onion and garlic. As with the meat cook and stir until a deep golden brown. Remove from pan and add remaining oil. Add carrots and celery, stirring and heating until a deep golden brown.

3) Return meat and onions to the pan. Add 1 cup of red wine (and pour yourself another), the beef stock, and V-8 juice. Make sure you scrape up all the crusty brown stuff off the bottom. Stir in the tomato sauce, basil, oregano, thyme, bay leaves, slat and pepper until well mused. Bring the lot to a boil and then reduce the heat and let it simmer uncovered for a bout 1-1/2 hours. Give it a stir every now and then. Pour yourself some more wine!

4) Stir in rest of the wine, mushrooms, artichoke hearts, asparagus, potato and peas. Simmer for another 1 - 1/2 hours or until meat is super tender.

5) Taste for seasoning, check consistancy - if too thick add more liquids like more wine, tomatoe sauce, beef broth etc - in same proportions as recipe calls for. It should be a thickened gravy-like consistency...NOT a thick, mushy muck. Remove bay leaves. ladle into bowls with lots of warm thick hunks of baguette - sprinkle with parsley and VOILA!

Oh and of course pour yourself another glass of wine........and ENJOY


keeper


Aug 21, 2007, 2:21 AM
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Re: [climb_eng] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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This recipe is one I'm playing with for a cookbook that has been in the works for years. I consider it a "moderate" on the difficulty scale because of all of the dicing although those handy with a food processor can simplify the dish... just don't pulverize the ingredients and you're golden. The key to this recipe is fresh ingredients. I take criticism well so hack it apart all you want.




Orange and Black Bean Salsa

1 clove garlic, mashed to a paste.
1 small red onion, diced as fine as you can get it (avoid graters and food processors if you can... they tend to juice an onion).
1 Jalapeno, diced fine. (Seeds and veins removed if you want to keep it mild.)
1 red bell pepper, diced fine.
2 small green onions, sliced thin.
1 orange, see below for preparation.
The juice from the orange in the previous step.
1 Tablespoon fresh chopped cilantro (About a half a bunch cleaned of stems and chopped fine. Use fresh or forget it.
1 fresh lime, juiced (nothing that came from a plastic container shaped like a lime please)
cup tomato juice (I use V8)
cup red wine vinegar
cup olive oil
1 tablespoon black pepper (always ground fresh when possible)
2 teaspoon salt (add more to taste if needed)
2 teaspoons dried oregano (1 tbls of fresh if you have it)
1 teaspoon cumin
1 Large can Goya black beans, drained and rinsed

***The orange: Using a potato peeler, carefully peel the orange getting as thick a strip of orange peel as possible without getting the bitter white pith. Line up the resulting strips of peel and dice them as fine as possible. Juice the rest of the orange and reserve.

Simply combine the ingredients, let sit over night, and serve with chips, over fish, or even chicken.

Go light on the salt and pepper at first and add more as needed.


keeper


Aug 21, 2007, 2:52 AM
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Re: [slablizard] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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slablizard wrote:
Why camping? You never cook at home? Ahh Americans! ;)

PASTA ALLA CARBONARA
(Carbonara's pasta)

bacon
Eggs
Olive oil
Parmesan cheese
pasta (short pasta like "penne" is better)
Pepper
Salt

Put the water on the fire, add salt in the water

mix the eggs, I use one egg for each person.

In a separate pan set a little olive oil and fry the chopped bacon,

you will need REAL LEAN bacon, (pancetta) not the tipe used for American breakfast it looks like this
[image]http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/5177G4VXE5L._AA280_.jpg[/image]

When I use regular US bacon I throw away 80% of it...the white fat part and keep just the meat.

when the water boils put the pasta in, keep an eye on the cooking time 7 minutes is usually enough..."al dente" means that the pasta is almost crunchy, and doesn't stick. no stlicky stuff that's chinese noodles, not pasta.

mix parmesan cheese with the eggs and add some pepper, someone adds milk to make it more creamy. I don't.

Take the pasta out when it's done, drain it and put it in the LARGE pan you used for the bacon, stir it on the fire a bit.

As an alternative you can use the pot you just used to boil the pasta, pour the olive oil and the bacon over, start mixing and add the eggs, with the fire still on.

The eggs are supposed to cook a bit within the hit pasta itself, but not completely.

Add a bit of olive oil if it's too dry.
Serve and eat warm, before the eggs dry out.

Learn how to twist your fork and eat spaghetti, pick a little and twist the fork around, make small bites...AND DON"T LET ME SEE YOU USING A SPOON or worst cutting the pasta...
You can use short pasta instead of spaghetti.

Red wine or beer...a go-go
Perfect after a long climbing day...trust me. Wink

A final long burp will express your appreciation.

Enjoy!


Spaghetti alla Carbonara literally means "Spaghetti in the Manner of the Charcoal Maker". Some believe that the dish was once popular with Charcoal makers who lived on the Mountains near Rome because the ingredients were easily portable and cooking was fairly uncomplicated. Others believe the dish derives its name from all the freshly ground pepper that is added to the spaghetti at the last minute. Actually, the origin of the dish is quite recent, since it was unknown before Second World War. The dish uses pancetta or guanciale, which are similar to bacon. If you want to stay true to the Roman heritage of the dish, you must use grated Pecorino Romano cheese, but it can be substituted by Parmesan. A mix of the two cheeses is also common.

Most Anglo-American recipes add cream to the dish.[1][2] This is not how the original Roman/Italian dish is made, however.[3]

http://en.wikibooks.org/...hetti_alla_Carbonara

A few things I might add with all of this info... the big distinction between pancetta and American bacon is we smoke ours. Every American deli counter seems to sell pancetta these days so ask for pancetta by name because its a key component to the dish.

Also, those who use cream or milk, like myself, should try using only the yoke of the egg... adding the white tends to make it taste more like scrambled eggs. Stir in the yoke off heat shortly before serving to produce a rich creamy sauce without needing to reduce the cream or milk. For the Salmonella conscious use pasteurized egg yokes.

Oh, and long flat noodles are my favorite for a cream sauces... not Penne. But that's just what I was taught.


Partner philbox
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Aug 21, 2007, 4:11 AM
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Anyone here ever heard of a Dingoe's breakfast. It's a drink of water and a look around.


Partner macherry


Aug 21, 2007, 5:07 AM
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that dingo ate my baby!!!


Partner j_ung


Aug 21, 2007, 2:35 PM
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But, obviously, not for breakfast.


slablizard


Aug 21, 2007, 4:59 PM
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Re: [themadmilkman] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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themadmilkman wrote:
slablizard wrote:
pasta (short pasta like "penne" is better)

SHORT pasta? Never on a carbonara! You need a long, thick pasta, like a fettucine or a linguine, if not thicker.

Also, certain regions in Italy add cream to the dish as well.

Ahem...want to came in Rome and check for yourself? Wink Carbonara is a Roman dish...other versions are..imitations Cool

I was suggesting penne for the spaghetti-challenged.


overlord


Aug 22, 2007, 10:53 AM
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Re: [slablizard] The RC.com Cookbook [In reply to]
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the best buccini or eggplant recipe.

peel and dice the eggplant/buccini
put a dab of oil into a pan
put the eggplant/buccini into a rag and spin in around some to dry it off
throw it out the window, get the steak from the fridge and put it into the panCool

anyway, ill post some recipes tommorow or the day after. i dont really have the time right nowWink


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